Topic: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Exemplars

Guides for Students

Diploma Exam Information

Released Items for 30-1 Reading Comp: https://education.alberta.ca/media/3402 … 161219.pdf

30-1 The Personal Response to Texts Assignment (1 hour): Personal Prose Response to Literature written in a creative prose form(not poem or lyric) practiced during your course. The exam booklet usually has an excerpt story/novel, a poem, and a visual. All pieces are selected for a specific unifying theme: similar(but by no means limited to) to what I've posted on "focus questions".

Visuals: http://iblog.stjschool.org/visuals/

http://iblog.stjschool.org/dsader/engli … questions/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_prose
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prose
http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Short-Story
Responses can be personal, creative, critical. Typically a short story, narrative, or narrative essay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essay

wikipedia wrote:

... to understand the basis of the facts and quotations used to support the essay's argument, and thereby help to evaluate to what extent the argument is supported by evidence, and to evaluate the quality of that evidence. The academic essay tests the student's ability to present their thoughts in an organized way and is designed to test their intellectual capabilities.

Although the 5 paragraph essay format is quite poplar for this assignment, it is not required. Establish a voice, develop ideas, connect ideas from test literature to ideas from personal experience or creative inspiration. Do not connect to literature studied during your course. Connect to detailed, relevant, and insightful personal experience, or more philosophical/creative ideals. Show off your best style, select precise language, wrangle with complexity, and build a confident expressive voice. The tone of the more successful responses tend to a high quality of Lexical_density .
Example?
Can you write about duality and paradox and how our ends are not necessarily shaped by our means?

30-1 Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment (2 hours): Critical/Analytical Response to a piece of literature studied during your course.  Select ideas from a single, challenging, appropriate piece literature studied during your course - usually the main novel or drama of the course or a challenging and accessible short story. Discuss the ideas generated from and significance of details you connect. A traditional essay format(1600-2000+ words) is the norm: opening, thesis, body paragraphs, closing.

Identity Formation through Existential Crisis

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Tips for Writing a Critical Essay About Literature

http://www.ehow.com/how_6980208_write-c … ature.html

https://penandthepad.com/write-intro-pa … -2289.html

https://classroom.synonym.com/write-con … 94221.html

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

From OWL: Writing Literary Analysis

https://onedrive.live.com/View.aspx?res … bJwypxG17c

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Short-Story

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Stream of Consciousness Narrative Techniques

http://www.ehow.com/info_7876139_stream … iques.html

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Third Person Narrative

http://www.ehow.com/facts_5117367_third … tive_.html

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Tips for Narratives

http://www.ehow.com/info_7811343_techni … ative.html

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Focus Questions on the Human Condition

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Year->Subject->Response to Sources->Critical Idea   
2009 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Setting up the Drums"; Novel: "Redemption"; Visual: "120km/h", 1975->struggle to restore honor and certainty
2009 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Prayer for Horizon"; Novel: "The Novice"; Visual: "Lovers smooching in car on a beach at sunset"->significance of idealism and truth   
2010 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Swing Valley"; Novel: "Home Place"; Visual: "Lovers in a stare down in front of a coyote cage" 1962->individuals pursue or compromise their happiness   
2011 ELA 30-1 Poem: "The Jackhammer Syndrome"; Novel: "The Orchid Thief"; Visual: "Diogenes: man holding lamp and an immense tangle of wire"->conflict between pursuing a personal desire and choosing to conform   
2011 ELA 30-1 Poem: "The Stricken Children"; Novel: "Divisadero"; Visual: "East European condo man behind smoked glass"->the role adversity plays in shaping an individual's identity   
2012 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Prodigal"; Novel: "Late Nights on Air"; Visual: "Boy on a motorbike looking back"->impact of an individual's ambition on self and others   
2012 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Late for the Double Header"; Novel: "When Alice Lay Down with Peter"; Visual: "Lorenzo Plus"->the interplay between how individuals perceive themselves and are perceived by others
2013 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Useless Boys"; Novel: "Cutting for Stone"; Visual: "The Fall of Superman Near Bliss Street Station (V4)"->the human need to make a commitment or renounce a course of action

Year->Subject->Response to Sources->Critical Ideal 1-> Critical Idea 2   
2014 ELA 30-1 Poem: "The Tent Delivery Woman"; Novel: "Saturday"; Visual "Crosswalk in the Rain"->the impact significant events have on an individual’s ability to determine their own destiny->the role kindness plays when individuals attempt to determine their own destiny
2015 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Itinerary"; Novel:"If You Hum Me a Few Bars I Might Remember the Tune"; Visual:"Barefooted carney asleep on the Himalaya ride"->the ways in which individuals deal with the uncertainties of the past->the human need to reconcile the uncertainties of the past with a new or present situation
2016 ELA 30-1 Poem: "The Leaving"; Novel: "And the Birds Rained Down"; Visual: "Coney Island 1969 -2 In Wins"->the forces that inhibit or encourage an individual’s actions->the nature of motivations that direct an individual’s course of action
2017 ELA 30-1 Poem: "About My Father's Plot to Get  Home"; Novel Excerpt: "The Road Past Altamont"; Visual: "Habitar La Oscuridad" ->  the ways in which individuals deal with the prospect of an uncertain future? ->imagination affects an individual’s willingness to embrace or reject an uncertain future.
2018 ELA 30-1 Poem: "Perpetual Motion"; Novel: "All My Puny Sorrows"; Visual: "Approaching Shadow"->the impact of separation in an individual’s life->the role emotional courage plays when an individual experiences separation

Year->Subject->Response to Visual->Analysis of a Literary Character->Functional
2008 ELA 30-2 Muslim women in the surf in Algeria->significant events can change an individual's perspective->speech to Town to host a music festival
2009 ELA 30-2 2 pics of families with and without food->courage is an important quality->letter to School Board to install a security system
2009 ELA 30-2 survivor and his home following an earthquake in China->a moment of crisis can have significant consequences->    letter to Town to build a condominium complex
2010 ELA 30-2 past/present pics of Canadian Rockies->dangers we face lie beyond our understanding->speech or letter to School Board to install "Virtuosity 3D System"
2011 ELA 30-2 young and old veteran in uniform->our beliefs are influenced by the actions of others->speech or letter to Town to close the library
2012 ELA 30-2 recreational waterpark in Mumbai and women gathering water in Ethiopia->the ability to face hardship is an essential human quality->speech or letter to Town to close movie theatre
2013 ELA 30-2 soldier handing water bottle to smiling father and child->individual actions affect the lives of others->speech or letter to the school board to adopt a dress code
2014 ELA 30-2 soldier watching children play soccer in midst of bombed ruins->perseverance is an essential human quality->speech or letter to town to ban ATVs
2015 ELA 30-2 soldier feeding orphan kitten->moments in our lives that have lasting significance->a speech or letter that will persuade the School Council to either ACCEPT or REJECT the proposal to separate core courses by gender at the high school
2017 ELA 30-2 children crossing a river on an innertube-> an individual’s life can be altered by a particular experience->speech or letter to school council to  accept or reject the Bring Your Own Device proposal

Year->Subject->Assignment 1->Assignment 2   
2010 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->Temporary suspension of rights and freedoms is necessary to guarantee the preservation of democracy   
2011 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->Every country should be left free to pursue its own goals   
2012 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->self-interest, individualism, the government interferes   
2013 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->the need to protect civil liberties undermines the stability of the state, ruled by a strong leader best serves the common good.   
2014 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->The government must take decisive action to protect citizens during times of crisis. During periods of
stability, however, citizens must have freedom from unnecessary government control.
2015 SOC 30-1 Liberalsim->Individuals are, by nature, unique and unequal. Efforts by the state to interfere with the lives of individuals will result in a restrictive and inefficient society
2016 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->A strong leader supported by an expert group of advisors will guide a country to greatness. Giving uninformed citizens the responsibility of making decisions about critical issues would prove disastrous to the country.
2017 SOC 30-1 Liberalsim->Governments have an obligation to provide support to individuals experiencing immediate or ongoing crises. Without this support, these individuals would be denied the opportunity to improve their well-being.
2018 SOC 30-1 Liberalism->A government involved in the lives of its citizens is crucial to ensure the common good. Without government intervention, self‑interest would undermine society.

Year->Subject->Assignment 1->Assignment 2->Assignment 3
2010 SOC 30-2 characteristics of a liberal democracy->the role of individuals in society->governments pass laws mandating the hiring of people based on their race, ethnicity, or gender
2011 SOC 30-2 characteristics of a dictatorship->the role of individuals in society->Canada withdraws troops from Afghanistan
2012 SOC 30-2 characteristics of a command economy->the role of government in society->Canada health-care system privatized
2014 SOC 30-2 influence political decisions in a democracy->the role of government in society->voter-competency test
2015 SOC 30-2 values in collectivism->the role of individuals in society->decriminalize the possession of marijuana
2016 SOC 30-2 liberalism vs. classical liberalism->the role of government in society->mandatory voting
2017 SOC 30-2 characteristics capitalist economy->->the role of individuals in society->mandatory snow tires
2018 SOC 30-2 values in collectivism->->the role of government in society->mandatory vaccinations

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-1 Discuss the idea(s) developed by the text creator in your chosen text about…

1988 January       the struggle to come to terms with human isolation
        June            the struggle to maintain identity through a commitment to a belief, cause, or goal
1989 January       turning points
        June            the effect of external or internal limitations on people’s lives
1990 January       self-discovery
        June            the outsider
1991 January       the influence of an ideal on individual behaviour
        June            the influence of imagination on people’s lives
1992 January       the manners in which individuals respond to challenge
        June            the basis for and impact of individual choices
1993 January       the factors that contribute to and result from an individual’s desire to escape
        June            individual responses to significant dilemmas
1994 January       human isolation and its effect on individual lives
        June            influence of dreams, goals and ideals in individual lives
1995 January       effects of adversity on the human spirit
        June            the individual in the face of threatening forces
1996 January       the impact of significant experience
        June            the individual in the midst of conflict
1997 January       the consequence of the individual’s response to risk-taking
        June            the nature and effect of a ruling passion in an individual’s life
1998 January       the significance of the individual’s response to challenge
        June            the impact of a turning point upon an individual
1999 January       personal resourcefulness
        June            the pursuit of ideals
2000 January       the significance of an individual’s perspective
        June            perseverance
2001 January       adaptation
        June            circumstances that compel us to respond
2002 January       responses to circumstances beyond familiar experience
2003 January       responding to individual differences
2004 January       the significance of our memory of the past
        June            the significance of determination in our lives
2005 January       an individual’s attempt to secure the satisfaction of self-fulfillment
        June            an individual’s attempt to reconcile the desire to act independently with the need for security
2006 January       the effect an individuals perspective has on personal beliefs
        June            the role self-preservation plays when individuals respond to competing internal and external demands
2007 January       the role self-respect plays when an individual responds to injustice
        June            the significance of an individual’s attempt to live unconstrained by convention or circumstance
2008 January       the interplay between fear and foresight when individuals make life-altering choices

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Literary Terms:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allusion
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anecdote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphorism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostrophe_(rhetoric)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumlocution
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clich%C3%A9
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Context_(language_use)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_negative
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/exclamation
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbole
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Innuendo
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/inversion
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jargon
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malapropism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaphor
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metonymy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narration
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non_sequi … ry_device)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopoeia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxymoron
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox_(literature)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallelism_(grammar)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parody
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personification
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proverb
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pun
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhetorical_question
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satire
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simile
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superlative
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synecdoche
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliteration
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assonance
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literary_consonance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellipsis_(linguistics)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homonyms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallelism_(rhetoric)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parenthesis_(rhetoric)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solecism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoonerism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermeneutics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallacy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phallogocentrism
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyche_(psychology)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophists
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syllogism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_(literature)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mood_(literature)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospher … al_design)

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

ELA 30-1 Reading Comp Released Items
Have a look at some of the released items from ELA 30-1 from recent years.

https://education.alberta.ca/media/3402 … 161219.pdf

Notice a handful of questions have words in BOLD: primarily, most strongly, etc. The pattern is consistent that bold words indicate any number or all choices may be correct to some degree. One answer is more correct than the rest, however. Also notice that multiple sources can be considered across a range of questions: a question on a picture, then a question considering the picture and a reading.

Lingo (Jargon) from these Released Diploma Items:
alludes
serve to depict
image
allay
reinforces the concept
develop a sense
context suggests the allusion ... implies
serves mainly to reinforce
apostrophe (figure of speech, not the punctuation mark)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostroph … of_speech)
simile
allusion implies
contrast
continuity is conveyed
omission
stanza
irony
ironic implication
juxtaposition
evoke
nihilism
stage direction
shrewd

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 January 2004 Released Items:
Readings:
https://archive.org/details/englishlanguage2004albe_0

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Written-response Assignment Suggested Word Count
Range
English Language Arts 30–2 Assignment 1: 300–700 words
English Language Arts 30–2 Assignment 2: 400–900 words
English Language Arts 30–2 Assignment 3: 300–600 words

• Visual Reflection Assignment - usually a photo showing a high contrast of emotional ideas.
• Literary Exploration Assignment - identify textual support for a "human condition" idea in a piece, then write about a character studied
• Persuasive Writing in Context Assignment - write a speech or letter - usually in support or opposition to a local/municipal political issue - closing a library, build a community theatre, etc.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Suggestions for Writing the Visual Reflection Assignment
Consider all the details of the visual text(s). Then ask yourself which details are most significant
to you. Consider any introductory comments, captions, and footnotes that accompany the text(s).
This information may help you in your understanding of the text(s) and the context.

The details you select should support your development of the ideas and impressions you choose
to discuss. This focus will help you to establish and sustain your unifying effect, which you will
make clear by statement or implication. Your observations and conclusions about the visual
text(s) may include discussion of emotions, attitudes, situations, and themes presented in or
inspired by the text(s).

An important point to remember is that there is no “correct” answer or approach to the
Visual Reflection Assignment. When choosing the prose form that will best communicate your
ideas and impressions, consider the ideas and support that will allow you to compose the most
effective response.

Organize your writing in a clear, focused manner. Have a plan for presenting your ideas and
impressions. Different prose forms, of course, have their own unique characteristics. There is a
difference in style between a journal entry and a newspaper article, for example. Likewise, the
conventions of a personal narrative are different from those of expository writing. Understanding
the conventions and style of the prose form you have chosen is essential. Regardless of the prose
form you choose, make sure that you support your ideas with adequate and appropriate details
from the text(s) and/or the context you have chosen to use.

Possibly the most important advice we can give you is to have confidence in your ideas and
impressions. Trusting your ideas, impressions, and feelings will enhance the creation of your
writing voice. Use your time efficiently. If your response is clear, focused, organized, and well
supported, you will be successful.

Exemplar Visuals: http://iblog.stjschool.org/visuals/

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Assignment II: Literary Exploration
The Literary Exploration Assignment requires you to read a short selection of fiction or
nonfiction that serves to illustrate one possible dimension of the topic.

You must discuss a character from literature or film that you have studied in English Language
Arts 30–2. You may choose to write about more than one character and from more than one
literary text. You should use the Initial Planning to help you to select a character (or characters)
relevant to the assignment and interesting to you from the short stories, novels, plays, poetry,
nonfiction, or films that you have studied. You must write in prose.

Provide support and explanation for your response with details regarding the character(s) from
the literary text(s) you have chosen to discuss. Please remember that teacher markers have read
both the reading selection on the examination and the text(s) that you have studied. They expect
you to write accurately and thoughtfully about the character(s) you choose to discuss. Use
specific examples from the text(s) to support your ideas about the character. Avoid mere plot
summaries.

In your writing, you should consider your own prior knowledge and/or experience. These
knowledge-based or life-based observations can include examples from personal experiences, the
experiences of others, and current and/or historical events. You may also choose to refer to the
reading selection provided in the examination.

The Literary Exploration Assignment is worth 25% of the total examination mark (Parts A and B
combined) and is assessed in four scoring categories: Thought and Support (10%), Form and
Structure (5%), Matters of Choice (5%), and Matters of Correctness (5%).

The time suggested to complete the Literary Exploration assignment is approximately 70 to 80
minutes and the suggested word count range is 400–900 words.
Suggestions for Writing the Literary Exploration Assignment

Read the assignment box before you read the selection provided. This can help you to focus your
reading of the selection.

Use the Initial Planning page to first consider your answer to the topic question. This answer will
become your controlling idea. Then, choose a character or characters from a literary text or texts
you know well, that is meaningful to you, and that is relevant to the assignment. Make sure that
the character(s) you choose will serve to illustrate your ideas on the topic. As you plan and
proceed, be sure that your selection of character(s) allows you to purposefully reflect and
develop the topic in enough detail to support your controlling or unifying idea logically and
convincingly.

As you plan, you may become more confident, or you may decide that your initial choices
restrict your ability to explore the topic or will not provide sufficient supporting detail for an
effective discussion. At this point, you should reassess and re-explore to find the best way to
address the topic. You may also find that your initial choice of character(s) does not provide
appropriate support for your ideas and that you must reconsider your choice of literature.
Markers will consider the ideas presented in the Initial Planning when considering the
effectiveness of your response. The suggested time for this pre-writing reflection is
approximately 10 minutes. Budget your time wisely.

You will be assessed on your ability to develop a focused controlling idea or unifying effect, your
ability to select relevant and specific support, and your ability to clearly and effectively organize
your ideas. It is also important to use words and sentence structures that are clear, correct,
precise, and familiar to you. Teacher markers want to read your ideas expressed in your own
words. Use language that you understand. However, do not use inappropriate slang or informal
language that may weaken your ideas.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Assignment III: Persuasive Writing in Context
The Persuasive Writing in Context Assignment is a practical writing exercise. The assignment
describes a hypothetical, real-world situation involving a proposal that requires a response in the
form of a speech or a letter. You must either accept or reject the proposal.

The assignment also includes two pages of source material consisting of a variety of information
sources, which may include web pages, excerpts from print and online articles, opinion polls,
emails, letters, blogs, meeting minutes, charts and graphs, photographs, and maps. The English
Language Arts 30–2 Information Bulletin contains an example of a Persuasive Writing in Context
Assignment with this type of source material.

In order to use the source material to support your argument, you will need to sort, evaluate, and
synthesize the information provided. Some sources can be used to support either position; such a
source contains information that may be useful in developing an argument either for or against
the proposal. In addition, certain sources may be related to one another. For example, one source
may clarify or provide specific details that support the argument made in another source.

Teacher markers will assess the persuasiveness of the argument you have developed, the
specificity and relevance of supporting detail, and the quality of your language and expression.
The Persuasive Writing in Context Assignment is worth 15% of the total examination mark (Parts
A and B combined) and is assessed in two scoring categories: Thought and Support (10%) and
Writing Skills (5%).

The time suggested to complete the Persuasive Writing in Context assignment is approximately
40 to 50 minutes and the suggested word count range is 300–600 words.
Suggestions for Writing the Persuasive Writing in Context Assignment
Read the situation, the assignment box, and the instructions just below the assignment box first.
This will help you understand how the source material on the pages that follow relate to and
develop positions on the situation in question.

Create a clear and specific purpose for your writing by directly responding to the task in the
assignment box and by thoroughly considering the complexity of the issue.
You will then need to select the form you will use to present your argument (either a speech or a
letter). Make certain that you are familiar with the conventions of the form you choose. For
example, the structure and content of the introductory and closing comments in a letter are
different from those of a speech.

Effective persuasive writing features a clear position on the issue, which is supported by
arguments that contain specific and relevant details. It is not sufficient to merely restate
information provided in the examination booklet. You should read and consider the source
material to determine which pieces of information you wish to use to develop your position. You
do not need to use all of the information provided; in fact, you may choose not to use any of it.

Specific details that support your argument can also come from your own knowledge and/or
outside experience. You must also consider your audience and the appropriateness of the
language you choose.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Requirements of Part B: Reading
Being able to demonstrate reading comprehension skills without the use of a dictionary or
thesaurus is essential for the Part B: Reading portion of the diploma examination. Part B
requires you to draw on the understanding, knowledge, and skills that you have developed as a
reader. Your critical reading and thinking skills—understanding of vocabulary, appreciation of
tone and literary and rhetorical devices, understanding of the purpose and effect of a text
creator’s choices, and appreciation of human experience and values reflected in literary texts—
will be assessed at the level of challenge appropriate for graduating English Language Arts 30–2
students.

In the Readings Booklet, you will read selections from a variety of texts, such as poems or songs,
essays, drama (including television or radio scripts or screenplays), short stories, novels, and
visual texts. The reading selections are not taken from the reading list for your course of
studies. Visual texts may be present within a text to enhance the reading and help you establish
context, and/or they may be present as independent reading selections with questions. You may
be asked to identify how elements of a visual text convey meaning, relate to the purpose of the
text, or contribute to the total effect of the text.

In a separate Questions Booklet, you will read and answer multiple-choice questions about each
reading selection. The questions ask you to form literal understandings; to infer, apply, and
analyze; and to assess and form generalizations about the texts provided. Some questions require
you to consider more than one reading selection. If linked readings and questions have been
included, you should read the passages and answer the questions in the order in which they
appear in the examination booklets.

Multiple-choice Questions
Questions for each reading selection focus on content, context, and technique. Each set of
multiple-choice questions is designed to progress logically and sequentially through the reading
selection. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that you answer the questions in the order in
which they appear.

The initial questions in a set will usually address the beginning of the reading and may alert you
to important ideas or details that will help you to understand the whole text. For example, such
questions may ask about a character’s emotions or the impact of the setting or atmosphere. The
following is an example of an early question on a fiction excerpt:

The statement “All those living beings had found places to hide” (line 3) creates the impression
that the rain is
A. cleansing
B. comforting
C. suffocating
D. threatening

The middle questions within a set address specific elements of the selection. For example, there
may be questions about characters such as their motivation, behaviour, relationships, attitudes,
traits, conflicts, and feelings. There may also be questions on vocabulary, figures of speech, the
writer’s attitude or tone, and the effect of the writer’s choices.

The following is an example of a middle position question from a novel excerpt:

The fact that “They were face to face now” (lines 68 to 69) supports the idea that the relationship
between Fine Man and the horse is based on
A. conflict
B. equality
C. courage
D. eagerness

The final questions in a set often require you to consider the reading selection as a whole. For
example, these questions may focus on main idea(s), context, theme, writer’s purpose, or
intended audience. The following is an example of a final-position question from a novel excerpt:

In lines 99 to 100, the writer suggests that, like water, the horses are symbolic of
A. life
B. death
C. stillness
D. confinement

Linking questions will ask you to identify similarities and contrasts between two or more
passages that are linked thematically. For example, a question may ask you to identify the
significance of a quotation from one text in the context of another. The following is an example
of a linking question from a set that consisted of a nonfiction excerpt followed by an excerpt
from a screenplay based on the same events.

The respect evident in Patterson’s description in Reading II of Singh as “a fine powerful Sikh”
(line 27) is echoed in which of the following quotations from Reading III?
A. “This is singh’s funeral pyre” (line 21)
B. “There is a terrible sense of shock” (line 25)
C. “he holds his hands out in singh’s gesture one final time” (line 27)
D. “the flames; they continue to rise” (line 29)

Evaluation questions have words in bold type, such as most strongly or most directly. Bold
type is used within a question to emphasize how you must evaluate the choice of alternatives,
such as choosing the best possible answer from the alternatives or choosing the one answer that
stands out as an exception to the others. All the alternatives (A, B, C, and D) may have a certain
degree of correctness. However, the correct alternative is the best answer to the question, given
the context provided by the directing words in bold type. Always return to the text(s) to consider
the specific details in context before you answer an evaluation question.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Suggestions for Writing Part B: Reading
Read the selections in order. The sequential placement of passages in the Readings Booklet is
intended to help you. Passages are arranged in terms of accessibility, complexity, and genre
balance. In addition, reading passages and answering questions out of sequence dramatically
increases the possibility of making an error on your multiple-choice answer sheet.

Read the entire selection before attempting the questions. When you read each selection,
consider the title, as well as any introductory comments and/or footnotes. This information will
help you understand the reading selection and may also be required to answer one or more
questions correctly. For example, the title of a selection may represent its main idea or theme.
Introductory comments for a reading selection, written specifically for the examination, provide
information regarding the context of the excerpt, the plot, or the relationships among characters.
Footnotes can provide contextual information, clarification, or definitions that you need in order
to understand the reading selection.

As you answer the questions, be sure that you understand what is being asked. You may
want to underline or highlight important aspects of the reading or of the questions to help you
stay focused. Certain questions require you to focus on a key or directing word to select the
correct answer. For example, the question “What is the irony in John’s humorous comment?”
focuses on irony, not humour. As well, a question that asks the meaning of a word, such as
diverged, may require you to determine the meaning of the word from the context of the lines in
which it appears.

Pay particular attention to factors in each question that will limit the possible correct
answer. When direct quotations are included in a question, use the line references provided and
reread the quotation within its context in the reading. Make sure that you understand the
significance of the quotations in the context of both the question and the reading. Carefully
consider key words that direct the question, such as verbs and terminology, and key words that
give clues to characters’ emotions and behaviours.

Try to save enough time to go back to questions that you found difficult or were uncertain
about. Use all your acquired reading skills to reconsider the question, its context, and the
“answer.” However, if you cannot think of a valid reason why you should change an answer, do
not do so. Trust your instincts and your reading-comprehension skills.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-2 Reminders

When writing Part A: Written Response:
• You may use the following print references: an English and/or bilingual dictionary, a
thesaurus, and an authorized writing handbook.
• On the Initial Planning page of the Literary Exploration Assignment, you must state your
answer to the topic question, identify the character(s) from literature you have chosen, and
name the author(s). Space is also provided for you to begin planning your ideas.
• Write the title of the literature you have chosen on the space provided on the back cover of the
examination booklet.
• If you have used a word processor, you must indicate that you have done so on the back cover
of the examination booklet. Be sure that you have securely attached all your work to the
booklet. If you leave the examination room with hard copies of your work, you will be
violating examination regulations. Every school has copies of the Diploma Examinations
Program: General Information Bulletin, which is also available on Alberta Education’s website
at education.alberta.ca and includes a section about computer use for diploma examinations.

When writing Part B: Reading:
• You may not use any dictionaries or reference materials.
• Read the passages and answer the questions in the order that they are presented.
• Read each passage in its entirety before answering the questions.

For both Part A and Part B, the examination booklets are your working copies. If underlining,
highlighting, or making notes on what you are reading is helpful, do so. However, for the Part B:
Reading component, be certain that your answers are recorded on the multiple-choice answer
sheet.

Be sure that you know the date, time, and writing location of your examination and that you
bring the materials with you that you will need. You must provide your own pen, HB pencil,
eraser, and highlighter. As well, if you wish to use authorized reference materials during
Part A, you must provide your own.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

Rescore Provisions
You may request a rescoring of your examination. Before you apply for a rescore, be sure to
check your Diploma Examination Results Statement to see what marks you have been awarded
on both parts of the examination. Keep in mind that if you do request a rescore, your new
mark, even if it decreases, will be your final mark. There is a fee for this service, which is
refunded if your diploma examination mark increases by 5% or more. Follow the procedures on
your Diploma Examination Results Statement to apply for a rescore.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-1 Requirements of Part A: Written Response
Understanding the writing requirements for Part A of the diploma examination is an essential
part of your preparation. As well, make sure that you are familiar with the scoring categories
and scoring criteria listed in the English Language Arts 30–1 Information Bulletin, which is
available on the Alberta Education website. An understanding of the scoring criteria may help
you to fulfill the writing tasks. Experienced English Language Arts 30–1 teachers use the scoring
criteria to mark your examination.

https://education.alberta.ca/media/3273 … 161005.pdf

Teacher-markers are familiar with both the texts provided in the examination and the literary
texts chosen by students in the Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment. You
are expected to write thoughtfully about the assignment topic and one or more of the texts in the
Personal Response to Texts Assignment and the literature you use to support your ideas in the
Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment. Express your thoughts clearly, and
support them with relevant references and examples. Avoid merely repeating—without any focus,
discussion, or direction—the topic, details, or quotations from a text. Try to communicate ideas
that are meaningful to you.

Each assignment has a suggested time limit, as well as a suggested word count range. You may
use each of these as a guideline when responding to each written-response assignment. The
suggested word count range is not a cap, and if you hand write you are not expected to hand
count your words.

To improve your writing, use all the time available to
• read the assignments carefully
• identify the ideas and/or impressions that are meaningful to you and that are relevant to the
assignment
• plan your response thoughtfully before beginning to write
• consider carefully whether or not you are clearly and effectively communicating your ideas to
the reader, and make any necessary revisions

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-1 The Personal Response to Texts Assignment
The Personal Response to Texts Assignment requires you to explore a given thematic topic
in response to texts provided. Texts will include visual text(s) and any combination of poetry,
fiction, and/or nonfiction. A brief comment relating the texts to the thematic topic will be
provided. The assignment is to write about what these texts suggest to you about the topic
presented.

Select a prose form that is appropriate to the ideas you want to express and that will enable you
to effectively communicate your ideas to the reader. Do not use a poetic form. Support and
develop your response with reference to one or more of the texts and to your previous knowledge
and/or experience. You may respond from a personal, creative, and/or analytical perspective.
Make a careful and purposeful choice when selecting a prose form and a perspective because
your choices determine the set of expectations that the markers will have as they assess the
success of your presentation. Choose a prose form from the ones that you have practised and
mastered in your English Language Arts 30–1 course.

The time suggested to complete the Personal Response to Texts Assignment is approximately
45 to 60 minutes and the suggested word count range is 600–1200 words.
Be sure to give
yourself an appropriate amount of time for planning and revision.

The Personal Response to Texts Assignment is worth 20% of the total examination mark
(Parts A and B combined) and is assessed according to two scoring categories: Ideas and
Impressions and Presentation, each worth 10% of the total examination mark. This assignment
also introduces you to the thematic context of the Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts
Assignment.

Suggestions for Writing the Personal Response to Texts Assignment

Because the Personal Response to Texts Assignment is thematically connected to the Critical /
Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment, read and reflect upon both assignments before
you begin the first assignment.

As you read the texts provided, consider all titles, captions, commentary, and footnotes. This
information may help you to understand the texts and their contexts. Choose a planning strategy
that is effective for the ideas that you want to communicate.

You are expected to reflect upon and explore ideas and impressions prompted by texts
provided in the examination and the assignment topic.

When considering which of the provided prompting texts to explore, select the text that is most
relevant to your own ideas about the topic. Your composition will be assessed on the basis of
your ability to relate the topic to your ideas and impressions formed by the reading of a text or
texts and to your previous knowledge and/or experience. Compositions that do not demonstrate
a connection to one or more of the texts provided in the examination OR that do not address
the topic presented in the assignment are assessed as Insufficient. A response assigned an
Insufficient, for any reason, receives a score of zero in all scoring categories.

There is no prescribed answer or approach to the Personal Response to Texts Assignment.

As you read and reflect upon each text, ask yourself the following questions:
• What ideas, feelings, or impressions does the text communicate to me about the topic?
• What details in the text create and convey these ideas, feelings, or impressions?
• What have I experienced or learned that is relevant to my ideas, feelings, or impressions of the
topic and/or the text?
• What ideas and support will allow me to compose the most effective response to the topic?
• How might these texts relate to one another, my ideas, and the topic?


Because students’ responses to the Personal Response to Texts Assignment vary widely—from
philosophical discussions to personal narratives to creative approaches—you will be asked to
identify the connection between the texts, the topic, and your response in the Initial Planning
section of the assignment. You also will be asked to identify what controlling idea you intend to
explore and how it addresses the topic.

Having confidence in what you are writing about will enhance the creation of your writing voice.
Trust your ideas. Use your time effectively. Use the Initial Planning section to identify your
connections to the prompting text(s) and to indicate how your response will address the question.
If your response is clear, focused, organized, on topic, and supported with reference to the text or
texts provided and to your previous knowledge and/or experience, you have done all that you can
to be successful. Remember, you need respond only to one text, but the connection to the text
must be clear to your audience.

When considering the prose form that will best communicate your ideas, ask yourself the
following questions:
• What prose form will allow me to communicate my ideas and impressions most effectively?
• What prose forms have allowed me to communicate successfully in my
English Language Arts 30–1 course? Have I mastered a creative approach? Or, are my skills
better suited to a personal or analytical composition in the context of a timed test?
• What prose form will best suit the ideas I want to present to the audience?
• How can I use language and develop my ideas effectively?

INSUFFICIENT Personal Response to Text Assignment
Compositions that provide no evidence of an attempt to fulfill the task presented in the
assignment are assessed as Insufficient. Insufficient is a special category. It is not an
indicator of quality.

Compositions are assigned an Insufficient when
• the student has responded using a form other than prose, OR
• the student has written so little that it is not possible to assess Ideas and Impressions, OR
• there is no evidence that the topic presented in the assignment has been addressed, OR
• there is no connection between the text(s) provided in the assignment and the student’s
response, OR
• there is no evidence of an attempt to fulfill the task as presented in the assignment.

A composition will also be assessed as Insufficient if the student uses a poetic form. Being
assessed as Insufficient means your response will receive a score of zero for Ideas and
Impressions and for Presentation.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-1 The Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment
The Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment asks you to demonstrate
your understanding of a literary text (or texts) that you have studied in detail in your English
Language Arts 30–1 course. The assignment is a further, more focused exploration of the topic
introduced in the Personal Response to Texts Assignment. Pay close attention to the wording of
the topic for the Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment. Because it is not
identical to that of the Personal Response, you need to consider the way(s) in which the thematic
context has been reframed for a more specific focus. You are expected to write about how
the assigned topic is reflected in the ideas developed by the text creator. You are expected
to write a thoughtful, well-developed composition in which you synthesize your thinking about
both the assigned topic and your interpretation of your chosen text. Your composition will be
assessed on the basis of your ability to express your understanding of the literary text, to relate
that understanding of the text to the assignment, and to support your ideas with evidence from
your chosen text.

In this assignment, you must focus your composition on a text or texts other than those
provided in the examination. Compositions that refer only to the texts provided in the
examination or that make no reference to literature studied are assessed as Insufficient. A
composition will also be assessed as Insufficient when so little has been written that it is not
possible to assess Thought and Understanding and/or Supporting Evidence, or the marker can
discern no evidence of an attempt to fulfill the writing task presented in the assignment.

When considering which text to discuss, select a literary text that you have studied
thoroughly, that you know well, that is meaningful to you, and that is relevant to the
assigned topic. Texts which have literary merit and complexity of theme and style provide you
with the opportunity to produce a persuasive critical / analytical response that contains insight
and substance. If you choose a text that has not been studied in depth in the classroom or that
lacks literary merit and complexity, you reduce your chances of producing a critical / analytical
response that will meet the standard for the English Language Arts 30–1 Diploma Examination.

The time suggested for you to complete the Critical / Analytical Response to Literary
Texts Assignment, including time for Personal Reflection on Choice of Literary Text(s), is
approximately 1½ to 2 hours and the suggested word count range is 800–1600 words.
The Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment is worth 30% of your total
examination mark (Parts A and B combined) and is assessed according to five scoring categories:
Thought and Understanding and Supporting Evidence (each worth 7.5% of your total
examination mark) and Form and Structure, Matters of Choice, and Matters of Correctness
(each worth 5% of your total examination mark). A response assigned an Insufficient, for any
reason, receives a score of zero in all categories.

INSUFFICIENT Critical / Analytical Response to Text Assignment
Compositions are assigned an Insufficient when
• the student has written so little that it is not possible to assess Thought and Understanding and/
or Supporting Evidence, OR
• no reference has been made to literature studied, OR
• the only literary reference present is to the text(s) provided in the first assignment, OR
• there is no evidence of an attempt to fulfill the task presented in the assignment.

Suggestions for Writing the Critical / Analytical Response to Literary Texts Assignment
Be sure that your selection and treatment of the literary text reflect and develop the assigned
topic in enough detail to sustain a thorough discussion of both the topic and the text at the
English Language Arts 30–1 level. You must be able to provide sufficient significant and relevant
supporting evidence from your chosen text to illustrate your ideas logically and persuasively.
Your discussion must demonstrate the depth of your understanding of the literature as well as
your response to it. (See Appendix A of this guide for a short list of texts that students often use
on diploma examinations.)

If you choose to support your ideas with more than one text, make sure that each text
purposefully supports and develops the unifying or controlling idea in your response. As well,
state clearly your reasons for using more than one text in the Initial Planning section and/or
in your response itself. A general guideline is to provide equal treatment of each text that you
reference. Consider carefully why you are examining a second text before you make it part
of your response.

Remember, markers do not read student responses written on literary texts they do not know
well. Be cautioned, however, that choosing texts that are rarely studied in English Language
Arts 30–1 classrooms may make it challenging for the examination manager to find markers
who are familiar with such texts during any given marking session. In the Initial Planning
section, identify the text that you will discuss in your response. Use the Personal Reflection on
Choice of Literary Text(s) part of the Initial Planning section to clarify your reasons for choosing
the literature you have identified. Markers will consider the ideas presented in the Personal
Reflection on Choice of Literary Text(s) when considering the effectiveness of your ideas and
supporting evidence.

The Personal Reflection on Choice of Literary Text(s) is intended to help you to clarify the ways
in which the topic is addressed by the text you select. As you reflect, you may become more
confident, or you may decide your initial choice restricts your ability to discuss the topic or does
not provide sufficient supporting evidence for an effective discussion. Use your time efficiently to
allow for time both to plan and to write a prose composition using supporting evidence from a
literary text that addresses the topic and demonstrates your detailed understanding.

When planning, carefully consider your controlling idea or how you will create a strong unifying
effect in your response. Develop your ideas in a manner that will effectively communicate your
literary interpretation and understanding to the reader. Your supporting evidence must relate
clearly to the topic and support your literary interpretation. Use only those events, circumstances,
or details that support or enhance your discussion.

Supporting Evidence
Do not merely retell the sequence of events in the text. Show that you have deliberately chosen
support to reinforce your ideas. Make sure that your evidence accurately represents the literary
text. Carefully integrated supporting evidence such as quotations or paraphrases will show
the reader that you appreciated the significance of the literary text you have chosen. However,
supporting evidence—while it is a significant requirement of the assignment—does not speak for
itself. The function of evidence is to illustrate or illuminate an idea that you have expressed in
your own words and to provide opportunity for further analysis or discussion.

Generally, it is best not to quote from a text unless (1) the quotation lends greater authority to an
idea than a paraphrase would or (2) the quotation is so significant or so emphatically stated that
a paraphrase would not capture the eloquence of the text. Paraphrase whenever the exact words
are not as important as the details they present. Practise the skillful integration of supporting
evidence, and refer to your English Language Arts handbooks for guidance regarding embedding
quotations and avoiding plagiarism when you summarize or paraphrase.

You should be cautious about embedding lengthy quotations, footnotes, or references into firstdraft writing because they often impede the unifying effect and the creation of an authentic voice. Providing bibliographic information or page references for your supporting evidence is not required in your response and may consume time you might use better in other aspects of your
preparation for and writing of the examination.

Re: Prepping for ELA 30-1 and ELA 30-2 Diploma Exams?

30-1 Appendix A: List of Literary Texts
The following appendix is a compilation of literary texts that students have discussed on diploma
examinations. If you are not in a classroom setting or wish to broaden your range of choices, you
may want to study one or more selections from each of the categories on this list. This list is not
prescriptive. Choosing literature from this list does not guarantee success. You may choose
from this list or from other appropriate literary sources, including film. You will find experience
with a variety of texts valuable in your preparation for writing the Critical/Analytical Response
to Literary Texts Assignment and essential to your preparation for the reading comprehension
required of you in Part B of the diploma examination.

Many of the short stories, poems, and drama selections in the following list are available in
anthologies. These and other helpful resources are available through many public and school
libraries.

Short Stories
“A & P”–Updike
“Araby”–Joyce
“The Boat”–MacLeod
“Boys and Girls”–Munro
“Cathedral”–Carver
“Dancing Bear”–Vanderhaege
“A Domestic Dilemma”–McCullers
“Eveline”–Joyce
“The Glass Roses”–Nowlan
“The Guest”–Camus
“Horses of the Night”–Laurence
“The Lost Salt Gift of Blood”–MacLeod
“Miss Brill”–Mansfield
“On the Rainy River”–O’Brien
“The Painted Door”–Ross
“Paul’s Case”–Cather
“The Rocking-Horse Winner”–Lawrence
“The Shining Houses”–Munro
“Sonny’s Blues”–Baldwin
“The Spaces Between Stars”–Kothari
“Touching Bottom”–Strutt
“The Wall”–Sartre
“The Yellow Wallpaper”–Perkins

Drama
All My Sons–Miller
Bethune–Langley
The Crucible–Miller
Death of a Salesman–Miller
A Doll’s House–Ibsen
The Drawer Boy–Healey
The Glass Menagerie–Williams
A Man for All Seasons–Bolt
Oedipus Rex–Sophocles
Man of La Mancha–Wasserman
A Raisin in the Sun–Hansberry
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead–
Stoppard
A Streetcar Named Desire–Williams

Nonfiction
The Glass Castle–Walls
Into the Wild–Krakauer
Into Thin Air–Krakauer
A Long Way Gone–Beah
Night–Wiesel


Full-length Fiction
1984–Orwell
The Ash Garden–Bock
The Bean Trees–Kingsolver
The Catcher in the Rye–Salinger
The Cellist of Sarajevo–Galloway
Crime and Punishment–Dostoevsky
The Grapes of Wrath–Steinbeck
Great Expectations–Dickens
The Great Gatsby–Fitzgerald
The Handmaid’s Tale–Atwood
Heart of Darkness–Conrad
The Hero’s Walk–Badami
Indian Horse–Wagamese
Jane Eyre–Brontë
The Kite Runner–Hosseini
Life of Pi–Martel
The Metamorphosis–Kafka
The Mosquito Coast–Theroux
My Name is Asher Lev–Potok
Oryx and Crake–Atwood
The Other Side of the Bridge–Lawson
The Outsider–Camus
The Poisonwood Bible–Kingsolver
Pride and Prejudice–Austen
The Stone Angel–Laurence
The Stone Carvers–Urquhart
Things Fall Apart–Achebe
A Thousand Splendid Suns–Hosseini
Three Day Road–Boyden
Truth and Bright Water–King
The Wars–Findley
Wild Geese–Ostenso
Windflower–Roy
Wuthering Heights–Brontë

Poetry
“My Last Duchess”–Browning
“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”–Eliot
“Ulysses”–Tennyson

Shakespearean Plays
Hamlet
King Lear
Othello
The Tempest

Film
Not all films studied in Grade 12 are effective
choices for diploma examination purposes.
Ensure that your choice is one that you have
studied in detail and know well. The list below
contains both original film presentations and
adaptations of written literary works. If you
are using the film version of a written text,
indicate this choice clearly in the Initial Planning section.

Apocalypse Now
A Beautiful Mind
Big Fish
Blue Jasmine
Citizen Kane
Dead Poets Society
The Godfather
Gran Torino
The King’s Speech
Lars and the Real Girl
Million Dollar Baby
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
Pan’s Labryinth
Pleasantville
Schindler’s List
The Shawshank Redemption
Stranger than Fiction
The Truman Show