26

Re: The Chrysanthemums

nzayac wrote:
dwebb wrote:

Does Elisa regret being with her husband Henry, now that she has met the Tinker?

No, I don't think she necessarily regrets being with her husband. Elisa however does wish that she could follow her dreams and be more adventurous. The time that Elisa lives in limits what experiences she can have and how much of the world she can explore. She knows that according to society, her rightful place is with her husband on their successful ranch. But her heart leads her in a different direction. She knows that she loves her husband very much, and that he will always love her back.

I think that an interesting question is, if Elisa would have followed her dreams, where do you think she would be and what would she be doing?

That is a very interesting question Nekayla. I don't think there would be just one certain place she would be, but all over the world. Elisa's character to me seems like she would be an independent women who wants to travel the world.

27

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

Personally, I don't think that there was a lady down the road. I think the the tinker was just saying this so that he could strike up a conversation and make her feel comfortable. This way, Elisa would eventually feel like her and the tinker had something in common and she would find something for him to fix and she would pay him. The tinker was simply there to gain some money, not to share thoughts.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

How are "gloves" a metaphor?

Re: The Chrysanthemums

nzayac wrote:
dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

Personally, I don't think that there was a lady down the road. I think the the tinker was just saying this so that he could strike up a conversation and make her feel comfortable. This way, Elisa would eventually feel like her and the tinker had something in common and she would find something for him to fix and she would pay him. The tinker was simply there to gain some money, not to share thoughts.

What detail confirm's the Tinker's lie?

30

Re: The Chrysanthemums

jozeller wrote:

Why is Elisa so upset when she sees that the Tinker threw away the Chrysanthemums? Is it because she worked hard to grow the chrysanthemums or more due to her relationship with the tinker?

Elisa is so upset when she sees that the Tinker threw away the Chrysanthemums because her Chrysanthemums were to be a symbol of feminism. If Elisa could spread her ideas (the Chrysanthemums) she would have made an impact on the world, no matter how small. The Tinker, however, ruined her chance at showing her skills, and what is important to a female.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

How are "gloves" a metaphor?

What is suggested by Elisa working with and without her gloves?

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dkonieczny wrote:
jozeller wrote:

Why is Elisa so upset when she sees that the Tinker threw away the Chrysanthemums? Is it because she worked hard to grow the chrysanthemums or more due to her relationship with the tinker?

Elisa is so upset when she sees that the Tinker threw away the Chrysanthemums because her Chrysanthemums were to be a symbol of feminism. If Elisa could spread her ideas (the Chrysanthemums) she would have made an impact on the world, no matter how small. The Tinker, however, ruined her chance at showing her skills, and what is important to a female.

Feminism? Specify.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feminism

33

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dabarr wrote:
ncoffey wrote:

Is Elisa upset that her life with her husband is boring and that she can`t do what she wants or is it just that the life of the tinker is what she really would like to do with her life, no worries, no responsibilities, no one to worry about hurting, or no one that you have to watch over all the time??

She might not be upset with her life, I think the life of the tinker just made her reflect on her own life. How the lack of excitement and predictability compared to his lifestyle which was full of the unknown. Envious is a term I would use to describe Elisa's emotions towards the tinker.

Do you think that Elisa will ever get the life of excitement she clearly desires?

I feel like Elisa may never be able to explore the world the way she wants to. The reason being that she is not brave enough to leave her home, her husband and her garden. When she met the Tinker some sense of inner strength was awakened within her but I feel she lost it again when her chrysanthemums were thrown on the side of the road. The story makes me hope that Elisa will eventually be brave enough to go out and explore.

Do you think Elisa will ever take a chance on showing her husband her true self? Or will fear of rejection keep her mask on for the rest of her life?

34

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
nzayac wrote:
dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

Personally, I don't think that there was a lady down the road. I think the the tinker was just saying this so that he could strike up a conversation and make her feel comfortable. This way, Elisa would eventually feel like her and the tinker had something in common and she would find something for him to fix and she would pay him. The tinker was simply there to gain some money, not to share thoughts.

What detail confirm's the Tinker's lie?

The detail that confirms the Tinkers lie, is because he chooses to take the alternate route that she suggested first, rather than the one that he was planning on going in the first place.

35

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

In my opinion, the tinker made up the lady down the road to get into Elisa's head and get a conversation going. He never said anything about the flowers until he was aware that Elisa had no work for him. Then he scanned the ground until he found what he was looking for.

36

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

Is there even a lady down the road? I certainly don't think there is a lady down the road. The Tinker could have said that just because he wanted business, make a couple bucks. He could have been scamming Elisa, but Elisa wouldn't have known that he was scamming her with all the compliments he was giving her.

37

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
nzayac wrote:
dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

Personally, I don't think that there was a lady down the road. I think the the tinker was just saying this so that he could strike up a conversation and make her feel comfortable. This way, Elisa would eventually feel like her and the tinker had something in common and she would find something for him to fix and she would pay him. The tinker was simply there to gain some money, not to share thoughts.

What detail confirm's the Tinker's lie?

The details that confirm the tinker's lie is when him and Elisa are in conversation he asks if she has any work for him to do, the text following says:

  "I'm sorry," Elisa said irritably. "I haven't anything for you to do."

    His eyes left her face and fell to searching the ground. They roamed about until they came to the chrysanthemum bed where she had been working. "What's them plants, ma'am?"

The change in topic proves the tinker's consistancy to close a deal - almost like Elisa's husband Henry and the two men at the beginning of the story.

Another detail that confirms the tinker's lie is when Henry and Elisa are on their way into town.

Far ahead on the road Elisa saw a dark speck. She knew.

    She tried not to look as they passed it, but her eyes would not obey. She whispered to herself sadly, "He might have thrown them off the road. That wouldn't have been much trouble, not very much. But he kept the pot," she explained. "He had to keep the pot. That's why he couldn't get them off the road."

The tinker did not care about Elisa's chrysanthemum's - he simply tossed them off the side of the road. Kind of symbolizing how unimportant Elisa's dreams were to him, and possibly the rest of the world.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

List the precise details the Tinker is to tell this lady.

39

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

How are "gloves" a metaphor?

Gloves are a protective shell for the hands. When she removes the gloves she removes her protective layer. She is out in the open,  vulnerable. she works with her bare hands and trusts the Tinker, and in the end she gets hurt.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

41

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

List the precise details the Tinker is to tell this lady.

After the Chrysanthemums root, place them one foot apart in rich soil,
In July, cut them down eight inches from the ground before they bloom
In September, they will bud, and she will have to take very good care of them by only choosing the buds you feel you should pick off, and you have to show you care, because something with such detail, and caring like gardening should be well taken care of.

42

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

List the precise details the Tinker is to tell this lady.

-rich dirt
-cut down 8'' in July (Before they bloom)
-Buds will start in Sept.
-Budding takes the most care

43

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

The thesis statement that I came up with for my Study Guide is: John Steinbeck thoroughly evaluates the feelings felt by women when they are forced to play the role of housewife given to them by society; the story clearly reveals a different side of Elisa to the extent that she appears to be more feminine, frustrated, and shameful.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dkonieczny wrote:
dsader wrote:
dsader wrote:

Who is "the lady down the road"?

List the precise details the Tinker is to tell this lady.

After the Chrysanthemums root, place them one foot apart in rich soil,
In July, cut them down eight inches from the ground before they bloom
In September, they will bud, and she will have to take very good care of them by only choosing the buds you feel you should pick off, and you have to show you care, because something with such detail, and caring like gardening should be well taken care of.

Why does the peddler ask "before they bloom"?

Re: The Chrysanthemums

nzayac wrote:
dsader wrote:

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

The thesis statement that I came up with for my Study Guide is: John Steinbeck thoroughly evaluates the feelings felt by women when they are forced to play the role of housewife given to them by society; the story clearly reveals a different side of Elisa to the extent that she appears to be more feminine, frustrated, and shameful.

What are your three subtopics?

46

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
dkonieczny wrote:
dsader wrote:

List the precise details the Tinker is to tell this lady.

After the Chrysanthemums root, place them one foot apart in rich soil,
In July, cut them down eight inches from the ground before they bloom
In September, they will bud, and she will have to take very good care of them by only choosing the buds you feel you should pick off, and you have to show you care, because something with such detail, and caring like gardening should be well taken care of.

Why does the peddler ask "before they bloom"?

Its strange, most flowers after they bloom you trim and cut them down. Its not normal to trim a flower before they bloom.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dkonieczny wrote:
dsader wrote:
nzayac wrote:

Personally, I don't think that there was a lady down the road. I think the the tinker was just saying this so that he could strike up a conversation and make her feel comfortable. This way, Elisa would eventually feel like her and the tinker had something in common and she would find something for him to fix and she would pay him. The tinker was simply there to gain some money, not to share thoughts.

What detail confirm's the Tinker's lie?

The detail that confirms the Tinkers lie, is because he chooses to take the alternate route that she suggested first, rather than the one that he was planning on going in the first place.

Quote?

Re: The Chrysanthemums

kdkrys wrote:
dsader wrote:
dkonieczny wrote:

After the Chrysanthemums root, place them one foot apart in rich soil,
In July, cut them down eight inches from the ground before they bloom
In September, they will bud, and she will have to take very good care of them by only choosing the buds you feel you should pick off, and you have to show you care, because something with such detail, and caring like gardening should be well taken care of.

Why does the peddler ask "before they bloom"?

Its strange, most flowers after they bloom you trim and cut them down. Its not normal to trim a flower before they bloom.

But the overall effect of cutting them down is...

49

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

A good thesis statement for this story would be, "In the story The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck, Elisa is in search for her true self, and she is asking herself "Do people sometimes confuse love with feelings?"and "What is a happy life?""

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dwebb wrote:
dsader wrote:

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

A good thesis statement for this story would be, "In the story The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck, Elisa is in search for her true self, and she is asking herself "Do people sometimes confuse love with feelings?"and "What is a happy life?""

Avoid listing questions in the thesis. Answers/statements needed.