Topic: Act III Questions

Act III
Scene I
Quote evidence that Banquo is suspicious about Macbeth’s manner of becoming king.

List some of Banquo’s good qualities. Why, then, does Macbeth plan to kill Banquo?

Give three arguments Macbeth uses to convince the murderers to kill Banquo.?

Explain Macbeth’s order: “Fleance must embrace the same fate.”

Scene II
Quote further evidence of Macbeth’s state of mind.

Macbeth also says, “…make our faces vizards to our hearts,/Disguising what they are.” How does this statement reinforce the theme of Appearance vs. Reality?

Quote further references to blackness, darkness, or blood.

What statement does Macbeth make that suggests Lady Macbeth is unaware of Macbeth’s plan to kill Banquo and Fleance? What does Macbeth’s statement indicate abouth their relationship as co-conspirators and about Lady Macbeth’s influence on Macbeth?

Scene III
The climax (or turning point) occurs in this scene, when the fortunes of the protagonist (the tragic hero) irreversibly turn for the worse. What is the climax specifically? Give a reason for your answer.

Scene IV
Explain the significance of Macbeth’s statement: “Thou canst not say I did it. Never shake/Thy gory locks at me.”

Lady Macbeth behaves in a manner that, though it is hypocritical, reveals other aspects of her personality. What are these aspects?

Note that six other references to blood occur in this scene, one of the major images in the drama. Quote them.

Quote words that indicate Macbeth’s current state of mind.

Lady Macbeth tells Macbeth that he “lack[s] the season of all natures, sleep.” How does this quote reinforce a previous statement by Macbeth regarding the importance of sleep?

Quote two examples of Macbeth’s intentions regarding further murders.

Why does Macbeth plan to see the witches?

Scene V
What characteristic of Macbeth does Hecate reinforce?

Scene VI
Lennox says, “How it did grieve Macbeth! Did he not straight,/In pious rage, the two delinquents tear,/That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?/ Was not that nobly done? Ay, and wisely, too!” What is his tone? What dos his tone suggest about his meaning?

Tell why Macduff goes to England.

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Re: Act III Questions

List some of Banquo’s good qualities. Why, then, does Macbeth plan to kill Banquo?:
Banquo's good qualities are his "royalty of nature", his "dauntless temper" (courage), and he has "a wisdom that doth guide his valor."

Macbeth plans to kill Banquo due to his fear of Banquo; he fears that Banquo might suspect him of murder and will not be afraid to act on his suspicions. . Banquo obviously has power to an extent too if his sons are kings. So Macbeth plans to kill him, because is fearful of Banquo's power and how he won't resist to act against him.

3 (edited by bnichols 2012-04-02 13:23:40)

Re: Act III Questions

Give three arguments Macbeth uses to convince the murderers to kill Banquo.?

1. That it was Banquo that had them locked up prior to Macbeth releasing them.
Macbeth:

That it was he in times past which times held you                                                                                        So under fortune, which you thought had been
Our innocent self

2.      That the Murders should take revenge for what Banquo has done to them.


MACBETH:



I did so, and went further, which is now
Our point of second meeting. Do you find
Your patience so predominant in your nature
That you can let this go? Are you so gospell'd
To pray for this good man and for his issue,
Whose heavy hand hath bow'd you to the grave
And beggar'd yours forever?



3.      That Macbeth himself can’t kill Banquo as they share “friends” who he would like to keep as friends.


MACBETH

So is he mine; and in such bloody distance,
That every minute of his being thrusts
Against my near'st of life: and though I could
With barefaced power sweep him from my sight
And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not,
For certain friends that are both his and mine,
Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall
Who I myself struck down; and thence it is,
That I to your assistance do make love,
Masking the business from the common eye
For sundry weighty reasons.

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Re: Act III Questions

Explain Macbeth’s order: “Fleance must embrace the same fate.”

The order stems from which Macbeth orders the Murders to kill Banquo and to which he states about Fleance,

“Whose absence is no less material to me
Than is his father's, must embrace the fate
Of that dark hour.”

The order was directed towards the murders to which they were told to kill Fleance.

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Re: Act III Questions

Macbeth also says, “…make our faces vizards to our hearts,/Disguising what they are.” How does this statement reinforce the theme of Appearance vs. Reality?

It reinforces the statement as Macbeth is stating to make our appearances deceive what is in our hearts, to show kindness when our intent is murder, to essentially have our faces mask our hearts. To invite Duncan to a banquet just so we can kill him.

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Re: Act III Questions

Explain the significance of Macbeth’s statement: “Thou canst not say I did it. Never shake/Thy gory locks at me.”

What Macbeth is saying, is that Banquo’s ghost can’t prove that he was killed by him, and to stop pointing his finger and accusing Macbeth.

Macbeth doesn’t want the guilt of being haunted by Banquo’s ghost, when there was no evidence that he did anything. He would rather have the same comfort as anyone else.

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Re: Act III Questions

Tell why macduff goes to England??
- Macduff flees Scotland because is he scared that he will be blamed for the murder of the late King Duncan. He fled to England along with Donalbain and Malcom.

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Re: Act III Questions

Explain Macbeth’s order: “Fleance must embrace the same fate.”
in addition to beni's post. Fleance must die as well because if he lives he will become king just as the three witches predicted.

9 (edited by asommer 2012-04-02 14:41:10)

Re: Act III Questions

Note that six other references to blood occur in this scene, one of the major images in the drama. Quote them.

MacBeth - There's blood on  thy face
Macbeth- Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold
Macbeth- It will have blood; they say, blood will have blood
MacBeth- The secret'st man of blood.

10 (edited by tyberg 2012-04-02 14:43:30)

Re: Act III Questions

Quote further evidence of Macbeth’s state of mind;
Macbeth - "We have scotch'd the snake, not killed it"
- implies that he is wiling to kill
"Ducan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing, Can touch him further."
- Macbeth seems to be implying that all the pressure is beginning to take its toll and being dead and having to worries would almost be better then his current situation.

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Re: Act III Questions

Lady Macbeth behaves in a manner that, though it is hypocritical, reveals other aspects of her personality. What are these aspects?


When we first see Lady Macbeth, she is already plotting Duncan’s murder, and she is stronger, more ruthless, and more ambitious than her husband seems to be when it comes to plotting against others. She seems fully aware of this and knows that she will have to push Macbeth into committing murder. At one point, she wishes that she were not a woman so that she could do it herself.
In scene IV, she asks Macbeth if he is a man, taunting him of appears to be his lack of masculinity at the moment, even though she is not a man herself to even say that statement.

Again in scene IV, she mentions, “this is the very painting of your fear”, acting cool headed over the murder and trying to get Macbeth back on his feet. But later on in the play, she suffers from night terrors and tries to wash her hands of the spilled blood, even if the blood isn’t there.  Obviously wishing that she had not committed the murder.

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Re: Act III Questions

Why does Macbeth plan to see the witches? -D. Sader

MACBETH
I hear it by the way; but I will send:
There's not a one of them but in his house
I keep a servant fee'd. I will to-morrow,
And betimes I will, to the weird sisters:
More shall they speak; for now I am bent to know,
By the worst means, the worst. For mine own good,
All causes shall give way: I am in blood
Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o'er:
Strange things I have in head, that will to hand;
Which must be acted ere they may be scann'd.

MACBETH
I’ve heard about this indirectly, but I will send for him. In every one of the lords' households I have a servant paid to spy for me. Tomorrow, while it’s still early, I will go see the witches. They will tell me more, because I’m determined to know the worst about what’s going to happen. My own safety is the only important thing now. I have walked so far into this river of blood that even if I stopped now, it would be as hard to go back to being good as it is to keep killing people. I have some schemes in my head that I’m planning to put into action. I have to do these things before I have a chance to think about them.

Macbeth is guilty of many crimes and they all are on his mind, he wakes up in the middle of the night from nightmares from his kills. During this awakening he plans to go see the witches about what the worst thing thats going to happen.

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Re: Act III Questions

What characteristic of Macbeth does Hecate reinforce?

Hecate reinforces Macbeth’s confusion; he believes that he is safe of death, which will lead to his own downfall. She wants the other witches to drag the confusion on and summon visions for Macbeth to see that will increase his sense of security.

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Re: Act III Questions

Quote further references to blackness, darkness, or blood.
" In the affliction of these terrible dreams
That shake us nightly."
"Than on the torture of the mind to lie
In restless ecstasy"
"O, full of scorpions is my mind, dear wife! Thou know'st that Banquo, and his Fleance, lives."

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Re: Act III Questions

Quote two examples of Macbeth’s intentions regarding further murders.
MACBETH
Blood hath been shed ere now, i' th' olden time,
Ere humane statute purged the gentle weal;
Ay, and since too, murders have been performed
Too terrible for the ear. The time has been
That, when the brains were out, the man would die,
And there an end. But now they rise again
With twenty mortal murders on their crowns
And push us from our stools. This is more strange
Than such a murder is.
Ex.2
MACBETH
There’s an old saying: the dead will have their revenge. Gravestones have been known to move, and trees to speak, to bring guilty men to justice. The craftiest murderers have been exposed by the mystical signs made by crows and magpies. How late at night is it?

16 (edited by trberg 2012-04-02 15:07:09)

Re: Act III Questions

Quote evidence that Banquo is suspicious about Macbeth’s manner of becoming king.

Banquo:

Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,
As the weird women promised, and I fear
Thou played’st most foully for ’t. Yet it was said
It should not stand in thy posterity,
But that myself should be the root and father
Of many kings. If there come truth from them—
As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine—
Why, by the verities on thee made good,
May they not be my oracles as well,
And set me up in hope? But hush, no more.

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Re: Act III Questions

Lady Macbeth tells Macbeth that he “lack[s] the season of all natures, sleep.” How does this quote reinforce a previous statement by Macbeth regarding the importance of sleep?


When Macbeth hallucinates seeing a bloody dagger in the air, he tells himself that it’s the time of night for such a hallucination. “Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse/ the curtained sleep. “ Sleep is curtained because of the bed’s canopy, but in the dark of the night, wicked dreams can pass through the curtains and sleep.

Lady Macbeth quotes that by saying he lacks the season of all natures; the natures that he said that seems dead. She tries to comfort him of his nightmares and tells him to sleep it out.

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Re: Act III Questions

What statement does Macbeth make that suggests Lady Macbeth is unaware of Macbeth’s plan to kill Banquo and Fleance? What does Macbeth’s statement indicate abouth their relationship as co-conspirators and about Lady Macbeth’s influence on Macbeth?
"Be innocent of the knowledge"
- This indicates that while Lady Macbeth wants to be knowledgeable of the situation Macbeth is in. But he tells her to simply be innocent of the knowledge. He doesn't want her involved in the murder for whatever reason. He believes that her being unaware is the best for them. This implies that he simply does not want her involved in the decision he makes. He believes that his knowledge is greater.

19 (edited by kirk.lawrence 2012-04-03 14:16:16)

Re: Act III Questions

Act III
Scene I

Scene II

Scene III
The climax (or turning point) occurs in this scene, when the fortunes of the protagonist (the tragic hero) irreversibly turn for the worse. What is the climax specifically? Give a reason for your answer.

Scene IV

Scene V

Scene VI
Lennox says, “How it did grieve Macbeth! Did he not straight,/In pious rage, the two delinquents tear,/That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?/ Was not that nobly done? Ay, and wisely, too!” What is his tone? What dos his tone suggest about his meaning?

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Re: Act III Questions

Lennox says, “How it did grieve Macbeth! Did he not straight,/In pious rage, the two delinquents tear,/That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?/ Was not that nobly done? Ay, and wisely, too!” What is his tone? What dos his tone suggest about his meaning?

MACBETH
...Such a heinous crime—how it saddened Macbeth! Wasn’t it loyal of him to kill those two servants right away, while they were still drunk and asleep? That was the right thing to do, wasn’t it? Yes, and it was the wise thing, too, because we all would have been outraged to hear those two deny their crime....

LENNOX said this in a proud voice and was proud of noble Macbeth for slaying the two "murderers" of Duncan. Lennox was also showing the Macbeth is a worthy replacement for Duncan. This was the last time the people seen Macbeth as a "noble" person, because he had just killed the King. (Shhh don't tell nobody he wants it to be a secret)

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Re: Act III Questions

The climax (or turning point) occurs in this scene, when the fortunes of the protagonist (the tragic hero) irreversibly turn for the worse. What is the climax specifically? Give a reason for your answer.
Scene three is the murder of Banquo by the three murders macbeth set up. Banquo puts up a good fight and just before he dies saves his son Fleance for Ross by killing Ross's horse. The turning point is this is the beginning of his tyrannical rule. It is the first kill in his supposed reign of terror. He supported Macbeth only to have Macbeth turn on him.