1 (edited by jsweeney 2018-01-30 16:12:50)

Topic: It

I have begun reading the famous book, It, by Stephen King.  It begins with a boy named George Denbrough, and his older brother William, but commonly known as stuttering Bill.  Bill was sick with influenza on the day Georgie died.  It had been many days of heavy rain, and George got his older brother Bill to help him build a paper boat.  It sights multiple occasions of how George feared monsters, creepy locations like the cellar beneath his house, and even the dark.  While following his paper boat that his brother had specially made and waterproofed for him, down the current of water in the corner of Jackson Street.  When the book fell into a sewer drain, which clearly upset Georgie, who exclaimed, "Bill's going to kill me".  This is where the author introduces the monster, Pennywise, the dancing clown.

Re: It

After the mutilatation and murder of Georgie by this mysterious clown, the next year during the local fair in Derry, a man in the gay community was murdered.  His name was Adrian Mellon.  After reading this book for a while, you start to notice that Derry is a very homophobic town, so Adrian, and his boyfriend Don Haggerty, were basically outcasts.  In the interrogation room, three local homophobic bullies were being accused of the murder, of beating Adrian, and then throwing him into the river.  They admitted to beating Adrian after he had beat the three of them in a battle of wits, and also a stupid carnival game, but they denied killing him.  All three boys, and even Don Haggarty said that they didn’t;t kill Adrian, but that someone dressed up like a clown in a grey jumpsuit took Adrian from the river and looked as if he was eating him.  The three boys were charged with murder and the clown was not mentioned in any trial, and blown off as if they were all high when the event took place.

Re: It

Stanley Uris was the first of the group to be called upon by Mike Hanlon.  He was so upset and school by the call that he went to his bathroom and committed suicide with a razor blade, and in his own blood wrote the word, “It” on the wall beside the bath tub.  Next was the once short, overweight kid named Ben Hanscom who grew up to be a highly successful and well known architect who slimmed out a grew tall.  Next was Eddie the fine boy who’s potential was only limited by his overprotective and over nurturing mother.  He had bad asthma but his mother used that as an excuse to keep him from sports, gym class, and any activity that there could be the potential of Eddie receiving a bump or bruise.  After his mother died and Eddie grew into a man, he married a woman almost identical to his mother, physically, and emotionally.  She made him take many vitamins and nutrients, and pills to protect him from ever getting sick, and it broke her heart when Eddie told her he had to go to Derry, without her, and potentially leave her forever.

Re: It

Mike Hanlon never left Derry.  Unlike most of the friends he grew up with, he never fled as soon as he was of age, desperate to leave everything that he endured behind, to forget his friends, family, and It.  He worked in the Derry library, flirted with the local librarian and all the daily routines of a single man in his late thirties.  It was in these last few months that he decided that he needed to contact his childhood friends, drag them back to the horrors deep in the city of Derry.

Re: It

It was happening again, what happened before.  Where kids went missing, and bodies turned up, looking as if they had been eaten.  Mike was noticing the signs, he knew that the police couldn't and wouldn't do anything to protect them.  There was a pattern now, a deadly pattern was beginning to show, that every 27th year, a huge amount of children would go missing, almost daily in fact. Reporting of a clown that was taking kids away, eating them, killing them, and that he always wore a grey jumpsuit, with big orange buttons on it.

Re: It

Ben Hanscom was leaving the library when he was attacked, by the gang of boys lead by Henry Bowers.  They drug him to the “Gay Man’s” bridge, and propped him up against the railing and beat him until he was barely strong enough to stand.  Henry’s sidekicks held each of Ben’s arms as Henry began to speak.  He advised Ben that the next time Henry needed answers on a test that if Ben failed to provide for him, the consequences would be severe.  He said this while he carved an “H” into his stomach.

Re: It

Mike was busy in his thoughts on this particular morning after having suffered through a night of mortifying nightmares.  One after another getting worse each one, each feeling more real than the last, and this morning he awoke in a cold sweat, with the sudden urge to ride his bike to the park, which had been predicted to be foggy in his dreams, and this was the first sign that things in his dreams were beginning to come alive before his eyes.  The author then cuts the scene to a memory of Mike's childhood.

Re: It

It was the beginning of spring but didn't currently feel like it until his father called him into the barn to help him push the old A-1 ford car with a truck box on it made of the old hen house.  Every year they did this, where Mike and his father would push the hybrid out, then push it down the hill hoping to retard the engine into starting, where then they would drive it into their neighbor's yard and drive it right back, but they had to worry for their neighbor was, in fact, Henry Bower's even more sinister father who might be inclined to attack someone for what he thought would be a very serious offence to drive into another man's yard unannounced an uninvited.

Re: It

Ben met some friends for a change, although they were also usual targets of bullying, it was a nice change from the constant loneliness Ben felt.  It was after a dramatic escape from Henry Bower’s that Ben watched as Henry and his thugs found poor, stuttering Bill and another boy that Ben could not recognize at that moment, building a dam.  Henry destroyed the dam and his thugs started beating on the two boys for a minute until neither was able to defend themselves, this was when they left, and it was safe for Ben to come help them.

Re: It

Bill needed help. His friend Richie was having an incredibly terrible asthma attack.  Bill was struggling to decide whether to leave Richie and potentially have him die here, as Bill would bike up to the drug store for a refill of Richie’s puffer, or to stay there and protect him from Henry, but watch him die from his asthma.  This was when the fat, shy kid, Ben Hanscom arrived.  He was covered in blood, and Bill filled him on the plan for him to run to the drug store, while Ben would stay with Richie, although it was almost impossible to understand over Bill’s stutter which was far worse than usual in this stressful situation.

Re: It

They say Bill was a reckless bike rider.  He went too fast, and had little control over his steering.  He also had the seat so high on his bicycle that when he was standing on his bike, he was sitting on the seat.  He did this on purpose though, which was unknown to most that would have just assumed that Bill’s parents could not afford to buy him a bike that fit him.  It was in this way that made him even more reckless behind those handlebars. In a panicked situation that Bill was in, I believe it is safe to assume that his focus would be less on this afternoon.

Re: It

Bill was in Georgie’s room for the first time since he was killed.  He was looking for something, something that he did not know what it was.  He was looking for George.  Just to feel his presence, looking for away to see his brother the way he was, a happy, and lovable kid, trying to fade the image of Georgie’s mutilated body on the street in his yellow rain slicker.  He looked through pictures, clothes and ribbons.  Bill cried, and cried, on Georges bed holding a photo of him, and missing him more than he had ever missed or wanted anything more in his life.

Re: It

Usually, after school, when Mike got home, there would be a note on the fridge or on the counter that would contain the nightly chores from Mike's father, Will, would expect for Mike to complete before bed and before he Will returned to the homestead.  Most days the chores on the note would be around an hour's length worth of labor on the farm.  At least two days a week though, there would be no note or else a note that said there were no chores or have a fun task Mike could do.  This was because Will believed that every boy needed time to fish even if fishing was not what he was doing.