Topic: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

What objective qualities do all bunnies have in common, all times all places, everywhere in the universe?

(Hint: read about carrots, first)

2

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

Kay, so we've established that rocks, carrots, bunnies, and humans have mass and weight.
As carrots do, bunnies also have life, take food, grow, and reproduce.
You stated that carrots are "passive", which in this case means the opposite of active.
Are bunnies defined as "active"?

3

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

If you pour a level 4 acid for sure they will react with that. And it depends on the definition of active you are talking about. If you use the definition of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_activity they would be active, but if you use the definition of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Activation under biology they would not be. Bunnies are also an active part of nature.

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

Active? Yes. They go out in search of food. They run around and play. They fight, they flee. A carrot does none of this.

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

dsader wrote:

Active? Yes. They go out in search of food. They run around and play. They fight, they flee. A carrot does none of this.

Need more contribution here, surely bunnies are more than just active carrots? What other objective qualities define a bunny?

6

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

bunnies are known to move very quickly. would that be one?

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

Someone has to reply to this thread, I forgot about it. It is unfinished. There must be a list of qualities all bunnies all times and all places have.

So far  a carrot is:

To sum up, a carrot has the following objective qualities:
• mass
• weight
• charge
• life
• take food
• grow
• reproduce
• passive

But a bunny is active rather than passive.

Is that the only objective difference between a bunny and a carrot? Is a bunny nothing more than active carrot?

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

Hey, this thread can't die, it isn't finished yet.

Someone keep it going, other than me.

9

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

Bunnies have the capability to think and make their own decisions. Where carrots do not have that ability.

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

smccormack wrote:

Bunnies have the capability to think and make their own decisions. Where carrots do not have that ability.

What thoughts does a bunny think about? Can it think thoughts other than "bunny thoughts"? Can it think coyote thoughts for example? Could it ever "get" algebra?

By it being a bunny, aren't all it's decisions already made for it? Could it make a free decision that was not "bunny-ish"?

A bunny can feel what a bunny is supposed to feel - whereas a carrot has no feeling. A bunny will feel pain and affection and behave, umm, predictably.

Here's a riddle: There are two bunnies and one carrot. What happens next? What does not ever happen?

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

tyberg wrote:

bunnies are known to move very quickly. would that be one?

So the earth is moving and rotating in one direction, and the bunny is moving in which direction?

12

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

You said that one quality of a carrot is to grow. Carrots stop growing when they are pulled out of the ground but couldn't a rabbit keep growing until there's no more life left in it?

13 (edited by tyberg 2012-05-03 15:13:18)

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

dsader wrote:
tyberg wrote:

bunnies are known to move very quickly. would that be one?

So the earth is moving and rotating in one direction, and the bunny is moving in which direction?

The bunny moves on earth, not relevant to earth, or in any specific direction. Now compare this to that of a fish, a fish can move on instinct, possibly upstream or they way of the current. A bunny however has no tangible force or flow that tells it to move, something it can physically feel, like current. A bunny may act on instinct but a fish has less freedom at least to my knowledge.

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/how-pack-animals-change-direction.htm

That article describes fish, as we know they move in schools, move based on there nearest neighbor's movement. Then who leads this movement? Who leads the human in a crowd movement?

"Australian researchers have found evidence that mosquitofish - much like human commuters - follow very simple rules of attraction and repulsion as they navigate a crowd."

""We found evidence that individuals are only responding to one neighbour - their closest neighbour - at any one time," says James Herbert-Read, lead author and PhD student at the University of Sydney. Instead of being concerned about what the group is doing as a whole, the fish only moves in relation to its neighbour."

Without getting into to much detail, the human moves based on instinct, external force, internal force, and obedience. This logic would say we move like fish would it not?

14 (edited by bnichols 2012-05-03 15:17:44)

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

dsader wrote:
smccormack wrote:

Bunnies have the capability to think and make their own decisions. Where carrots do not have that ability.

What thoughts does a bunny think about? Can it think thoughts other than "bunny thoughts"? Can it think coyote thoughts for example? Could it ever "get" algebra?

By it being a bunny, aren't all it's decisions already made for it? Could it make a free decision that was not "bunny-ish"?

I disagree. By being a bunny, it will live a structured life laid-out by either nature or we as humans, but it's decisions aren't pre-made for it. It has the ability, albeit very limited to make choice. Not all bunnies are the same, they don't all look the same, they don't all have the exact same body size as the bunny next to them. Some are obese bunnies, some are slim. If their decisions were all made up for them upon birth into bunny-hood, I believe all bunnies would look the same, and probably live in the same area. When forces outside of a bunnies control affects them negatively, the bunnies have a choice of either adapting or dying, and so they adapt. Also, since bunnies aren't like A.I programs you find in your average video game, I believe you'll find that they can make choices that aren't "bunny-ish", based on scenario and surroundings.

Beni N. wrote:

A bunny that lives with Bulldogs all it's life will think it's a bulldog

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

bnichols wrote:
dsader wrote:
smccormack wrote:

Bunnies have the capability to think and make their own decisions. Where carrots do not have that ability.

What thoughts does a bunny think about? Can it think thoughts other than "bunny thoughts"? Can it think coyote thoughts for example? Could it ever "get" algebra?

By it being a bunny, aren't all it's decisions already made for it? Could it make a free decision that was not "bunny-ish"?

I disagree. By being a bunny, it will live a structured life laid-out by either nature or we as humans, but it's decisions aren't pre-made for it. It has the ability, albeit very limited to make choice. Not all bunnies are the same, they don't all look the same, they don't all have the exact same body size as the bunny next to them. Some are obese bunnies, some are slim. If their decisions were all made up for them upon birth into bunny-hood, I believe all bunnies would look the same, and probably live in the same area. When forces outside of a bunnies control affects them negatively, the bunnies have a choice of either adapting or dying, and so they adapt. Also, since bunnies aren't like A.I programs you find in your average video game, I believe you'll find that they can make choices that aren't "bunny-ish", based on scenario and surroundings.

Beni N. wrote:

A bunny that lives with Bulldogs all it's life will think it's a bulldog

Ahh, the ambiguous bunny case. You are comfortable with ambiguities. Whether Bunny or bulldog, it is a slave it's fate isn't it? Does it really choose it's looks? If a bunny is destined to change colour, can it choose not to?

Rather than quibble the distinction between bunny and bulldog, the lesson I intend is about setting up the distinction between bunny(as an example animal) and human. You said "it will live a structured life laid-out by either nature or we as humans" - I support that. Bunny is slave to it's fate. It's bunnyishness is determined by nature. Further, do we agree that a bunny feels, it knows pain, it senses danger, it communicates, it knows affection - all as a bunny should? If a bunny can speak bulldog, then they both merely have a common quality - to communicate. Carrot's don't communicate. Well, they don't react my attempts at least, lol. Neither gets algebra, for sure.

As for "adaptation", we could argue that is a trait of all living organisms. The "age-old" argument over adaptation will be whether the organism has evolved through natural selection or has been "nudged" by the work of the creator.

At any rate a single bunny isn't in itself adaptable, it must breed, die, breed, die etc. before changes are noted in it's evolutionary tree. An Alberta bunny born in the Sahara desert will not suddenly begin to store water and grow humps. It would take many many generations of bunnies to see any new adaptation to a new environment, would't it?

If a single bunny could be taught to fetch a stick by a master bunny whisperer, could't all bunnies? But what can no bunny every be taught? There lies the distinction.

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

tyberg wrote:
dsader wrote:
tyberg wrote:

bunnies are known to move very quickly. would that be one?

So the earth is moving and rotating in one direction, and the bunny is moving in which direction?

The bunny moves on earth, not relevant to earth, or in any specific direction. Now compare this to that of a fish, a fish can move on instinct, possibly upstream or they way of the current. A bunny however has no tangible force or flow that tells it to move, something it can physically feel, like current. A bunny may act on instinct but a fish has less freedom at least to my knowledge.

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/how-pack-animals-change-direction.htm

That article describes fish, as we know they move in schools, move based on there nearest neighbor's movement. Then who leads this movement? Who leads the human in a crowd movement?

"Australian researchers have found evidence that mosquitofish - much like human commuters - follow very simple rules of attraction and repulsion as they navigate a crowd."

""We found evidence that individuals are only responding to one neighbour - their closest neighbour - at any one time," says James Herbert-Read, lead author and PhD student at the University of Sydney. Instead of being concerned about what the group is doing as a whole, the fish only moves in relation to its neighbour."

Without getting into to much detail, the human moves based on instinct, external force, internal force, and obedience. This logic would say we move like fish would it not?

Bunnies are active, carrots are passive. Interesting, are bunnies aware they belong to a group, or are they merely aware their neighbours are alike? hmm. I'd like to think bunnies have more control over their activity than fishes, and I think your research here shows it. Anyway, you make me wonder if a bunny is aware of it's own "groupiness"? Could a bunny ever be aware that all kinds of critters/organisms are in groups. If so, how could it know that? Does a bunny know in fact that it is a bunny? If a bunny has less "flow" acting on its movement (less than a fish - I agree), why are there so many places bunnies do not go?

Speaking of fish ... Ever wonder why are there are freshwater fish that can't survive in salt water (and vice versa)? Why are there fish that can survive in both salty and fresh water?

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

mackenzie.mcintyre wrote:

You said that one quality of a carrot is to grow. Carrots stop growing when they are pulled out of the ground but couldn't a rabbit keep growing until there's no more life left in it?

Rabbits grow, too. Yes, even gigantic ones named Harvey, lol.

Something limits all bunny growth: Planck's constant, maybe Shrek's constant? Nope. Hayflick limit, that's it.

But ... I also read somewhere that lobsters would simply grow and grow and grow. It is something else that limits there size rather than the cell division limit. Now, some evil scientist needs to jigger with the DNA of a lobster and a bunny and Mr. Dowd is on to something.


Is there life in a frozen carrot seed? Not so cut and dried I figure.

Re: Objective Qualities of a Bunny

Objective Qualities of a Bunny:
• mass
• weight
• charge
• life
• take food
• grow
• reproduce
• active
• feeling:pain, affection
• sense danger
• communicate
• slave to fate

Now what are the objective qualities of being human?