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Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
sberg wrote:
dsader wrote:

How is this ironic?

The tinker offers to sharpen her scissors. This is ironic because Elisa has transformed and grown flirtacious and confident while the tinker is in the yard, and has made her develop a desire to grow further into confidence. He offers to sharpen her scissors, only to cut her down when he dumps the chrysanthemums on the side of the road.

What do you think of her reply about the scissors? “No. My scissors are all sharp.”

I think that before the tinker arrives, Elisa is content with her life. She is not offered any other lifestyle. She watches her husband from her garden, her house is tidy, and Henry sold some cattle.  However, "Her eyes sharpened," when Henry complimented the talent of her planting hands. He invites to take her into town, to which she replies "Of Course, I'll like it." Elisa is not self-conscious that she is dressed in masculine clothing, as long as she is tending to her garden: her prized value. At this point in the story, her scissors are sharp. I also find irony in the tinker's line "Most people just ruin scissors trying to sharpen ‘em, but I know how. I got a special tool. " He ruined the sharpness of her scissors with his refusal, and when he tossed her chrysanthemums, her prized value, into the ditch. He used the special tool of flattery, and at the end of the story, one could argue that Elisa's scissors are now dull.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dwebb wrote:
dsader wrote:
dsader wrote:

"symbolisms and imagery "? Answer this question in the thesis.

List 3 "repressed feminine qualities" you'll quibble.

Freedom of a woman; choice of entertainment, labour, housing.
Whereas the Tinker allows Elisa to express her joy and feelings.

Sounds very "material".

Re: The Chrysanthemums

Do Henry, Elisa, the peddler sometimes confuse love with other feelings?

79

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
dwebb wrote:
dsader wrote:

List 3 "repressed feminine qualities" you'll quibble.

Freedom of a woman; choice of entertainment, labour, housing.
Whereas the Tinker allows Elisa to express her joy and feelings.

Sounds very "material".

Quite.

80

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
dkonieczny wrote:

John Steinback creates the character of Elisa Allen to demonstrate how humans find person fulfilment, how we get our needs met through others, and how we see ourselves compared to how others see us.

How? Answers to this question in the thesis please.

John Steinback creates the character of Elisa Allen to demonstrate how Elisa dreams about new experiences to fulfil her life, and how the tinker uses Elisa to gain wealth, and how Elisa sees herself as a strong, and determined female.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dkonieczny wrote:
dsader wrote:
dkonieczny wrote:

John Steinback creates the character of Elisa Allen to demonstrate how humans find person fulfilment, how we get our needs met through others, and how we see ourselves compared to how others see us.

How? Answers to this question in the thesis please.

John Steinback creates the character of Elisa Allen to demonstrate how Elisa dreams about new experiences to fulfil her life, and how the tinker uses Elisa to gain wealth, and how Elisa sees herself as a strong, and determined female.

Do not use the word "how" in your thesis. How is a question word, not an answer word.

How about this....


"Steinbeck's characterization of Elisa symbolizes the struggle all women have to pursue a determined ideal self in the face of material temptation."

How could you parse this into 3 body paragraphs?

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Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
kdkrys wrote:
dsader wrote:

Have a look at the thesis template on my whiteboard. Someone type it into this forum. Use "literary techniques" more specifically in the structure of your thesis.

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums evaluates the freedom of a woman in the early 1900's using the construct: of a rock, the garden, and true love.

"the construct"?

image, symbol, archetype?

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums evaluates the freedom of a woman in the early 1900's using the ideas of a rock, the garden, and true love.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

kdkrys wrote:
dsader wrote:
kdkrys wrote:

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums evaluates the freedom of a woman in the early 1900's using the construct: of a rock, the garden, and true love.

"the construct"?

image, symbol, archetype?

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums evaluates the freedom of a woman in the early 1900's using the ideas of a rock, the garden, and true love.

How about adding in specific language to argue about objects as symbols of ideas parsed into three clearer subtopics?

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums creates the symbols of a rock to represent _________, the garden to represent ____________, and ____________ to represent true love so that the modern reader can identify and defend universal human freedoms.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

mhynek wrote:
dsader wrote:

What are your favorite details from this story?

My favorite detail to the story is how she doesn't asked the man's name. It shows a sense of desperation in that she needs to feel any affection from anyone.

Interesting. The suggestion of intimacy without a proper introduction, how ..... modern. Hmm?

Re: The Chrysanthemums

kdkrys wrote:
dsader wrote:

How are "gloves" a metaphor?

Gloves are a protective shell for the hands. When she removes the gloves she removes her protective layer. She is out in the open,  vulnerable. she works with her bare hands and trusts the Tinker, and in the end she gets hurt.

How much "modern" work is still done bare-handed? A couple photo essays seemed to raise the idea that the very pursuit of leisure has made us lose some idea about the attachment we have to work. What is the future of the pursuit of human happiness - working with gloves on or gloves off?

86 (edited by kdkrys 2011-05-21 17:09:54)

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
kdkrys wrote:
dsader wrote:

"the construct"?

image, symbol, archetype?

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums evaluates the freedom of a woman in the early 1900's using the ideas of a rock, the garden, and true love.

How about adding in specific language to argue about objects as symbols of ideas parsed into three clearer subtopics?

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums creates the symbols of a rock to represent _________, the garden to represent ____________, and ____________ to represent true love so that the modern reader can identify and defend universal human freedoms.

John Steinbeck in The Chrysanthemums creates the image of a rock to represent Religion, the garden represents Eden, scissors and material tools to explain human condition, so the modern reader can identify, defend, or prosecute universal human freedoms.

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Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

John Steinbeck examines the role expectations play on our lives and how we let them affect our decisions.

88

Re: The Chrysanthemums

Why is it that Elisa Allen feels so strongly for her Chrysanthemums? Do they represent her life on the farm? Clean cut and already planned out?

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Re: The Chrysanthemums

dwebb wrote:

Does Elisa regret being with her husband Henry, now that she has met the Tinker?

I don't think she regrets being married to her husband after meeting the thinker but she just wanted to go out and experience different things and do things that normally she would never do. I think she thought that the thinker would have gave her that more than her husband but of course she still loves her husband.

Does this make Elisa more like the "River Mechant's Wife" or Donne's love? Ophelia or Gertrude? Is she now different than the "the women come and go... talking of Michelangelo" from Prufrock?

90

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dsader wrote:
dwebb wrote:
dsader wrote:

Avoid listing questions in the thesis. Answers/statements needed.

Oh? Alrightie then! How about
In his short story “The Chrysanthemums,” Steinbeck uses symbolisms and imagery to explore the repressed feminine qualities of Elisa, who is a strong person who is not taken seriously because she is a woman.

"symbolisms and imagery "? Answer this question in the thesis.

In his short story “The Chrysanthemums,” Steinbeck uses symbolisms and imagery such as Elisa being on her knees bowing, wearing mens clothing, and having to work in the garden, to explore the repressed feminine qualities of Elisa, who is a strong person who is not taken seriously because she is a woman.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

jozeller wrote:
dsader wrote:

What would be a good thesis statement about the story?

John Steinbeck examines the role expectations play on our lives and how we let them affect our decisions.

"how" is a question. Avoid the term here in your thesis. Answer the "how" in a statement that can be parsed into three clear supporting subtopics.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

dwebb wrote:
dsader wrote:
dwebb wrote:

Oh? Alrightie then! How about
In his short story “The Chrysanthemums,” Steinbeck uses symbolisms and imagery to explore the repressed feminine qualities of Elisa, who is a strong person who is not taken seriously because she is a woman.

"symbolisms and imagery "? Answer this question in the thesis.

In his short story “The Chrysanthemums,” Steinbeck uses symbolisms and imagery such as Elisa being on her knees bowing, wearing mens clothing, and having to work in the garden, to explore the repressed feminine qualities of Elisa, who is a strong person who is not taken seriously because she is a woman.

What are "repressed feminine qualities"? Any "postulates" in mind - especially free will? Any difference between "feminine" human qualities and the rest?

In his short story “The Chrysanthemums,” Steinbeck uses symbolisms and imagery such as Elisa being on her knees bowing, wearing mens clothing, and having to work in the garden to explore her repressed feminine qualities - _________, ___________, and __________.

Re: The Chrysanthemums

kneil wrote:

Why is it that Elisa Allen feels so strongly for her Chrysanthemums? Do they represent her life on the farm? Clean cut and already planned out?

Do we see ourselves as the flowers, too? Is there a weeping gardner pruning us or a peddler tossing us aside?

Interesting, the language of her gardening is the language of creation ... as in the original garden. Hmmm?