Topic: Ode to Autumn

http://iblog.stjschool.org/poetry/2014/ … to-autumn/
http://www.shmoop.com/to-autumn/

Re: Ode to Autumn

from the shmoop.com

Chew on This:

  • Keats portrays nature as if it were a shortsighted person who focuses only on the present time without care or concern for the future.

  • Despite several agricultural settings, the poem consciously ignores human beings and their activities.

  • The primary tension in the poem is between the forward motion of the day and the season and the speaker's desire to freeze time in each stanza.

  • The speaker recognizes that autumn has no chance of competing with spring.

  • The poem's transition from mid-day to sunset parallels the transitions from summer to winter.

  • Despite the speaker's attentions, autumn neither wants nor needs his praise. Autumn's inaccessibility contributes to his awe.

Re: Ode to Autumn

from the shmoop.com

Chew on This:
Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

  • Keats portrays nature as if it were a shortsighted person who focuses only on the present time without care or concern for the future.

  • Despite several agricultural settings, the poem consciously ignores human beings and their activities.

  • The primary tension in the poem is between the forward motion of the day and the season and the speaker's desire to freeze time in each stanza.

  • The speaker recognizes that autumn has no chance of competing with spring.

  • The poem's transition from mid-day to sunset parallels the transitions from summer to winter.

  • Despite the speaker's attentions, autumn neither wants nor needs his praise. Autumn's inaccessibility contributes to his awe.

  • The scenery of "To Autumn" changes, but there is no development of themes or ideas.

  • The end of "To Autumn" is much more ambivalent about the season than the beginning.

  • The concept of death can only be applied to the natural elements in the poem by projecting human experience onto them.

  • The mysterious and reflexive noises made by the animals in the last four lines subvert the speaker's anxiety about the death of the day.