Topic: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

Today, I will be talking "End Of Days" By Eric Walters. In the beginning of the book there was a giant butterfly fluttering through space, the wings of its solar panels extended to gather in the power that attached at strange angles gave it an awkward fragile look. The first thing they traveled to is Jupiter the journey of 759 million kilometers took nearly three years but once they got in there they saw what it looks like it was arcing into a perfect elliptical orbit above the poisonous atmosphere. Six years after leaving Jupiter, having made close passes of five different planets, it passed beyond the outermost orbit of the outermost planets. The scientists who had dreamed and conceived and then watched the life of the satellite would have marveled at its continued existence. When they got back to Earth everything was change and a car tuned onto a tree-lined street. The houses, almost identical, were neat and orderly and set well back from the road. The street lamps cast isolated pools of light onto the road, but the houses were dark, the residents quietly asleep in their beds. The car slowed to a crawl. The vehicle pulled over to the curb and stopped there was a three of the men entered the room and the leader took the bed covers and slowly peeled them away. The professor was hauled out of his bed by two of the men, gripping him under his arms and they wanted him because he was just a scientist in an obscure field who had devoted his life to research. Professor Sheppard was the scientist who devoted to his life research and he was brought to a plane and bring him somewhere else but eventually he was rescued by his captors. But then the leader of the people who kidnapped him was still looking for him his curiosity was now even greater than his fatigue or fear. He pushed open the door boldly and found himself face to face with a very familiar presence.

Re: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

Andrew Markell and Daniel Sheppard had been colleagues, researchers, and friends. His “death” had been a tremendous blow to Sheppard personally, as well as a loss to the scientific community. Sheppard had few true peers, and Markell was one of them Sheppard said “But I saw you in the coffin” and he was sputtered then Dr.Markell asked “The corpse was certainly supposed to look like me. Was it lifelike?” back to comments made at Andrew’s funeral about his numerous accidents and near-misses, and how he’d made excuses himself so that he wouldn’t have to be in a car with Andrew at the wheel. This had, at times, presented a problem, since Sheppard himself had never learned to drive. The professor felt a renewed surge of fear that drove away his stunted anger Sheppard was at a loss and struggled to provide an answer. Sheppard thought back to McMullin’s funeral and remembered his wife at the grave, two small children crying for their father. Markell gestured to a large mirror next to the door at the end of the room that Sheppard hadn’t noticed it. Seconds later, the door opened and a woman and a man entered the room, followed close behind by four men the men who had kidnapped Sheppard. Sheppard was reassured and frightened at the same time because he had experience of being hauled out in the bed by armed men. Hay was the friend of Sheppard that he was working as a scientist, Andrew said “The end of life is probable, but not definite.” “And that is why you are here,” Hay said. She stood up and extended her had. “Do you accept our invitation.” But Andrew took her hand and said “I accept.”

Re: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

A line of cars and vans waited at the big metal gate. The house, an enormous white mansion, sat in the distance, separated from the waiting vehicles by both a high stone wall and a long driveaway that meanders through the immaculately kept grounds. Joshua Fitchett was worried and had to call a press conference to continue to the main house, word came from Fitchett only when one of his companies announced its newest discovery, breakthrough, innovation, or invention. From computer software to metal alloys, from medical breakthroughs to theoretical analyses of human nature and aerospace technology, his work knew no bounds. The story, even coming from a genius like Joshua Fitchett, seemed too impossible to believe, and as he had predicted, immediately that the world ending in seventeen years. Less than twenty-four hours passed between the end of the Fitchett press conference and the first fire trucks appearing at the front gates of his mansion. The charred remains did belong to Joshua Fitchett, he had either been murdered or killed himself in some final act of insanity.

Re: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

Sheppard and Markell came into the boardroom and looked around earnestly. They had heard about Fitchett’s death. They had more reason than most to question it. Sheppard suspected that after Fitchett’s death announcement letting the entire world that the threat of existence of their organization and then the inferno at Fitchett’s mansion, things were about to change, and that change would be reflected in today’s meeting. The police car moved slowly along the street, trying to avoid the potholes, piles of garbage, and abandoned vehicles, mostly metal skeletons stripped of tires, seats and engines drained of any precious feels that might have been in the tank. Gordon asked. There was anxiety in his voice that he was trying unsuccessfully to hide.

Re: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

The young boy ran into the room. He was knocked to the ground, and two sets of boots crushed the boy chest and legs. He looked shocked and terrified. There was no reaction from the two older boys pinning him to the ground. Billy help the boy and let him go by the two older boys who beat the little boy up. Slowly, silently, Billy walked across the room until he was standing directly in front of the guard. Billy wasn’t somebody who wanted to cross, and the balance of fear and respect, violence and kindness, had brought some order to their lives. Room by room, floor by floor the police swept through the building. The absence of doors on the apartments made entry easier daylight to penetrate, but it was still difficult work. Ramsey took a quick glance toward the hall, where they both knew Gordon was waiting. Ramsey ducked out into the hall to the waiting officers. “Forget the next eleven floors. We go straight up to the top and seal it off.”

Re: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

There was an officers filed up both stairwells, their big boots on the concrete steps foiling their attempt to move silently. They’d have to rely more on speed than stealth. Ramsey approached the apex of the final flight of stairs. Reluctantly, the two officers scaled the stairs to the landing and took up positions on opposite sides of the boarded-up doorway. Ramsey had spent a lifetime assessing people. There was no threat, no bluff in that voice, just a calm statement of fact. Billy was dragged backwards by two officers, one on each side, his legs banging against the stairs as they hauled him down. Billy was swung and then thrown into the back, so that his head hit the fair side. Billy couldn’t help thinking that maybe nobody back there had got hurt, but what was in store for him now? Ramsey sat sideways in his seat so he could see both the road and Billy in the back seat. They walked across the room and through a metal door into a long corridor. They entered another, larger room. Sitting at the far side, behind a desk, was a woman working at a computer. She looked up at their approach.

Re: End Of Days, By Eric Walters

Hesitantly, opening the door only slightly, Billy peered in. His focus fell first on the only person in the room. There was a man an old man sitting behind a desk at the far end. Billy stepped in and closed the door behind him. Billy thought about that for a second. He had survived wilderness all right, but all of it inside the New York city limits. The man was writing something about Billy, his head was down, dismissing Billy as if he were no longer there. Billy pulled the handle and the door opened. “Do you think that your guards could get in here fast enough to stop me from snapping your neck” Billy asked. Billy glided across the room until there was now nothing separating them but the desk a distance he could easily hurdle. The man handed Billy an envelope. He looked inside. It was filled with photos. There was one of his mother, and one of him and his brother, his parents in their wedding clothes, a picture of a baby. He felt a rush of emotions he couldn’t afford to feel. He stuffed the photos back into the envelope.