Topic: To kill a Mockingbird by: Lee

I'm starting my November book talk today and I've managed to find 9 words in my book today.  Ambrosia, Impaired, Obstreperous, Provocation, Feeble, Contemporaries, Rudiments, Providence, and Foliage.  Ambrosia: the food of the gods or something very pleasing to taste or smell or a fungal product used as food by ambrosia beetles.  Impaired: weakened or damaged or having a disability of a specified kind.  Obstreperous: noisy and difficult to control.  Provocation: action or speech that makes someone annoyed or angry, especially deliberately or testing to elicit a particular response or reflex.  Feeble: lacking physical strength, especially as a result of age or illness or (of a sound) faint or lacking strength of character.  Contemporaries: a person or thing living or existing at the same time as another or person of roughly the same age as another.  Rudiments: the first principles of a subject or an undeveloped or immature part or organ, especially a structure in an embryo or larva that will develop into an organ, limb, etc.  Providence: the protective care of God or of nature as a spiritual power or God or nature as providing protective or spiritual care or timely preparation for future eventualities.  Foliage: plant leaves, collectively.

Re: To kill a Mockingbird by: Lee

Today I have managed to find 5 words in my book.  Vehemently, Vaguely, Jubilantly, Apoplectic, and Livid.  Vehemently means: in a forceful, passionate, or intense manner; with great feeling.  Vaguely means: in a way that is uncertain, indefinite, or unclear; roughly or slightly.  Jubilantly means: adjective. showing great joy, satisfaction, or triumph; rejoicing; exultant: the cheers of the jubilant victors; the jubilant climax of his symphony.  Apoplectic means: overcome with anger; extremely indignant or relating to or denoting apoplexy (stroke).  Livid means: furiously angry or dark bluish Gray in colour.  To kill a Mockingbird by Lee is very interesting and full of surprises so far,  I'm discovering more new words everyday.

Re: To kill a Mockingbird by: Lee

I have managed to find 6 words in my book today; Sequin, Camisole, Umbrage, Acquisition, Palliation, and Inaudible. 
Sequin means: a small, shiny disk sewn as one of many onto clothing for decoration or a Venetian gold coin.
Camisole means: a woman's loose-fitting undergarment for the upper body, typically held up by shoulder straps and having decorative trimming.
Umbrage means: offence or annoyance or shade or shadow, especially as cast by trees.
Acquisition means: an asset or object bought or obtained, typically by a library or museum or the learning or developing of a skill, habit, or quality.
Palliation means: Patients with terminal diseases usually need palliation. It's a kind of care that makes you feel better, even though it can't cure you. ... The Latin root word is palliate, or "cloaked," and palliation does in a sense cloak or mask a person's pain.
Inaudible means: unable to be heard.

Re: To kill a Mockingbird by: Lee

It's been a while since I've read last and I have managed to find only five words in my book today; Reconnaissance, Calomel, Tirade, Protruded, and Undulate.   
Reconnaissance: military observation of a region to locate an enemy or ascertain strategic features or preliminary surveying or research.
Calomel: a white power used as a purgative and a fungicide.
Tirade: a long, angry speech of criticism or accusation.
Protruded: extend beyond or above a surface.
Undulate: move with a smooth wavelike motion or having a wavey surface or edge.

Re: To kill a Mockingbird by: Lee

I have managed to only find two words in my book today Perplexed, and Cantankerous.
Perplexed: Completly baffled; very puzzled.  Cantankerous: Bad-tempered, argumentive, and uncooperative.
I have also just finished Part One of my book and I will be either starting to read Part Two or changing to a different book.

Re: To kill a Mockingbird by: Lee

I have started Part Two of my book today and found 6 words; Frivolous, Castile, Habiliments, Asafoetida, Kerosene, Austere.
Frivolous: Not having any serious purpose or value.
Castile: A variety of mild soap, made from olive oil and sodium hydroxide.
Habiliments: Clothing.
Asafoetida: A fetid resinous gum obtained from the roots of a herbaceous plant.
Kerosene: A light fuel oil obtained by distilling petroleum.
Austere: Severe or strict in manner, attitude, or appearance.