Topic: The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas

Starr, a teenage girl, is at a party with her friend, Kenya. She isn't supposed to be at this party, because these parties are dangerous. Garden Heights is dangerous. Kenya leaves Starr to talk with her other friends, when Starr sees Khalil. She hasn't seen him in a very long time, and by the clothing, and chains he is wearing, she knows what hes been up too. Starr doesn't want to ask him though, because she doesn't want to hear the truth. Starr and Khalil talk, as if it hasn't been long since they last saw each other. Soon gunshots go off in the house, and Khalil and Starr hurry out of there. Khalil has a new car, its nice. Starr asks Khalil about what hes been up to, but he doesn't admit he has been with the Kings. Khalil just avoids the question. The car is silent untill, they hear sirens behind them. Khalil wasn't speeding, and Starr and him weren't doing anything bad. There was no reason for the cop to pull them over. I think that this relates to a lot of places all over the world. Cops don't always have a reason for pulling African American people over. They just do because they are seen as threats. I'm not saying this would happen anyway. Mostly just neighborhoods like Garden Heights. "Shady" neighborhoods, where drugs are everywhere.

2 (edited by alexis.rehmann 2019-02-06 17:04:05)

Re: The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas

Starr's heart races as the police officer walks up to the car, and she remembers the talk her dad had with her when she was 12. "Do whatever they ask you to do, keep your hands visible, don't make any sudden moves, and only speak when spoken too." Khalil broke the first rule when the officer asked for his licence and he questioned why he pulled them over. Moments later the offivcer yelled and Khalil and told him to get out of the car. The officer pushed Khalil against the car, telling him to keep his hands on top of his car. He pats him down three times, finding nothing. The officer walked back to his car to grab something, when Khlalil moved his head inside the car to ask Starr if she was okay. That was when the officer shot Khalil. Three times. This is exactly what happened to Starr's other best friend when she was little. Two innocent peoples lives taken by cops. This just reflects the the influence of racism on police interactions with African Americans, which needs to stop.

Re: The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas

On the news, they don't show a picture of Khalil nor do they say his name. They only say "Suspected drug dealer shot by a police officer." They don't show pictures of when Khalil was little. They just classify him as something bad he's done. As if they think that will make up for what the officer did. Give the officer a reason to take his life, because he was a drug dealer. It's ironic how the police are the ones who are supposed to protect us, and our lives. Yet they are the ones shooting people. Innocent people. As if the world doesn't have enough corrupt, killers out there, the police are just making it worse, when they use violence like this.

Re: The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas

Starr sat on her bed in the dark. I think that the darkroom is connected to how Starr is feeling. She is feeling depressed and lonely since Khalil has died. She feels scared and alone. Not only this Starr feels guilty. She feels guilty that she's afraid to speak up about what happened when Khalil got shot. She feels like she's betraying Khalil for not saying the truth and not standing up for him.
I also connected the "Kings" as a family. Yes, they are a gang that is mixed up in drugs, but kids in Garden Heights only join for protection and shelter. So that they have someone that is always looking out for them. Making sure they have enough money for food. I'm not saying that it's good, and okay for them to be apart of a gang. I'm just saying the truth. That kids only join gangs because they have to.

5 (edited by alexis.rehmann 2019-02-22 11:00:05)

Re: The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas

By the end of the book, Starr found the courage to speak the truth about Khalil. She did it for Khalil. She told the jury the truth about why he was about of the King Lords but she also told them that he was unarmed and did everything the officer asked him to do. Even though she told the truth, the officer wasn't charged. Speaking out wasn't enough, and she felt as if she did nothing to help Khalil. If they did nothing about Khalil's death, will they ever do anything about racism and police violence?